About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, June 18, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Monday, June 18, 2018

Submarine USS Greeneville dry docked at Pearl Harbor. Sen. Mazie Hirono voted to add $45 million for Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam's Drydock Waterfront Facility, which passed as part of the National Defense Authorization Act today. See story, below. Photo from Wikimedia Commons
MAYOR HARRY KIM SUFFERED A MILD HEART ATTACK this weekend, according to a release from the Mayor’s office. Kim was taken to the Emergency Room at Hilo Medical Center early Saturday morning with a mild heart attack. On Monday morning, the Mayor was resting and recuperating in the hospital. The Mayor said he had suffered discomfort and his wife called 911 for an ambulance.
     Last week, “after working a very long day,” says the release, Kim was taken to the hospital early Friday, where he was diagnosed with a relapse of pneumonia.  He was released from the hospital the same day with doctor’s orders to rest.
     It is requested by the Mayor’s office that no calls or visits take place, to allow the Mayor to rest.
     “The doctor told me I can’t leave because he doesn’t trust me to rest,” the Mayor said. “I’d fire him if I could.”
Doctors command Mayor Harry Kim to rest in hospital
in Hilo. Photo from Big Island Video News
     The Mayor has been at the helm of the ongoing response to the Puna eruption, and late Thursday night he was taking a look at the preparations of the Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Recovery Center at Keaʻau High School gym, says the release. The facility opened its doors to offer individual assistance to the public on Friday morning.
     “I can’t tell you how proud I am of everybody in County, State, and Federal agencies for getting the DRC up and running in less than a day,” said Kim. He said he had worked closely with FEMA’s Deputy Federal Coordinating Officer Tom Fargione to make it happen.
     “We swore to each other to make this DRC the best in the nation as far as coordination and comprehensiveness of services,” the Mayor said.

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SEN. MAZIE HIRONO VOTED FOR THE 2019 NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT, which passed the U.S. Senate 85-10 today.  A a House and Senate conference committee will meet to resolve their versions of the bill.
Fort Shafter's received $105 million for its command and
control facility. Photo from Insynergy
      Hirono, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, “included provisions in the bill that fund military construction projects in Hawai'i, prevents per diem reductions for Department of Defense employees, closes a dangerous loophole that allows convicted abusers to purchase firearms, and promotes sustainable energy assurance and resiliency across our Armed Forces,” says a release from her office.
     Hirono said, “This year's National Defense Authorization Act includes a number of critical priorities for Hawai‘i. From improving readiness for our men and women in uniform, to strengthening our commitment to engagement in the Indo-Pacific region and stopping service members who are convicted of domestic violence from buying a gun, this comprehensive legislation will benefit our service members, their families, and the communities they serve.”
     Highlights of Senator Hirono-authored provisions include Hirono ensuring that every Hawai‘i military construction project in the President's Budget request was included in the NDAA. Senator Hirono and her colleagues were able to add two additional Hawai‘i projects worth about $53 million, bringing the total military construction authorized for Hawai‘i to over $360 million. The projects include: $105 million for Fort Shafter's Command and Control Facility; $50 million for the Wheeler Army Airfield Rotary Wing Parking Apron; $66.1 million for the Navy's Kaneohe Bay Corrosion Control Hangar; $78.32 million for Navy's Pearl City Water Transmission Line; $45 million for Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam's Drydock Waterfront Facility; and $17 million for Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam Construction Addition to F-22 Facility.
Wheeler Army Airfield Rotary Wing received $50 million.
Photo from Wikipedia
     The Senate bill includes Senator Hirono's amendment to prohibit per diem allowance reductions for our military service members and civilian workforce, including Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard employees, which limits their ability to be reimbursed for long-duration, mission-related travel.
     The NDAA also includes Senator Hirono's Military Domestic Violence Reporting Enhancement Act, which closes a dangerous loophole in the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) that enables convicted abusers to purchase firearms. The provision creates a charge of Domestic Violence under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and mandates that convictions must be reported to federal databases that would keep abusers from purchasing firearms within three days.

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KU‘IKAHI MEDIATION TOOK ITS PROGRAM TO VOLCANO SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES. During the 2017-2018 school year, 188 fourth, fifth, and sixth graders received training on mediating disputes among students at Volcano, Keonepoko, and Mountain View.
     Ku‘ikahi Executive Director Julie Mitchell said, “Peer mediation is a process where youth of the same age-group facilitate resolving disputes between two or more students. Mediators work in pairs and help classmates reach agreements that are fair, safe, and doable.”
Keonepoko Elementary School student Dakota Riddle and
parent volunteer Darcy Riddle during peer mediation
training for school year 2017-2018. 
Photo from Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center
     The non-profit community mediation received funding for the East Hawai‘i Peer Mediation Elementary School Program 2017-2018 from local supporters such as the Bill Healy Foundation, County of Hawai‘i, First Hawaiian Bank Foundation, Hawai‘i Electric Light, KTA Super Stores, and others.
     “We appreciate the support of companies like KTA Super Stores and Hawai‘i Electric Light, which have ongoing commitments to working with local charities toward a vision of a better Hawai‘I,” said Mitchell.
     When asked what they have learned as peer mediators, one student responded, “I learned a new way to handle conflict. I learned that if I have a problem I can ask for mediation. I have learned to be very respectful. I have learned that to solve a problem you need to be kind, and neutral. I am proud to be a peer mediator because I can help my friends.”
     Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center’s mission is to empower people to come together - to talk and to listen, to explore options, and to find their own best solutions. To achieve this mission, Ku‘ikahi offers mediation, facilitation, and training to strengthen the ability of diverse individuals and groups to resolve interpersonal conflicts and community issues. For more information, call Ku‘ikahi at 935-7844 or visit www.hawaiimediation.org.

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Overflight of Kīlauea Volcano's lower East Rift Zone by the
Civil Air Patrol provides context for the location of the Fissure
8 fountain and 
lava channel within the lower Puna District.
View is to the north. Photo from Civil Air Patrol
OFFICIAL COUNT OF HOMES LOST TO LAVA HIT 533 today, June 18, according to Hawai‘i County Civil Defense. Mayor Harry Kim estimated the loss at over 700, including unregistered homes. Civil Defense also reported 5,914 acres - or 9.25 square miles - have been impacted.
      Brian Shiro, seismologist at Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory, said Halema`uma`u sent ash up to 4,000 feet  above sea level at 6:12 a.m. today. It was “a very small, minor plume... one of the smallest ones yet,” he said. Pacific Tsunami Warning Center reported “the energy is like a 5.3 magnitude earthquake.” As with all seismicity from the eruption since the 6.9-magnitude earthquake of May 4, no tsunami is expected. Seismic activity continues at the same pace as in the last few weeks at Kīlauea Summit.
     Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported Fissure 8 continues to be “very active,” with a fast moving, channelized flow entering the ocean at Kapoho Bay. Fountaining at Fissure 8 is reaching heights of up to 180 feet. The vent is producing a large SO2 plume and a large laze plume at the ocean entry. Liz Westby, a geologist with USGS, said the delta formed by the lava flow is about 360 acres. HVO continues to monitor three other fissures that are weakly active. There is no immediate threat at this time.
Fissure 8 lava flows in an open channel all the way to the
ocean. Kapoho Crater is the vegetated hill on the right.
Ocean entry 
plume seen in the distance. Photo from USGS
     The National Weather Service reports that, Tuesday through Thursday, northwest winds are expected to push vog into the saddle and interior areas of the Big Island. Trade winds are predicted to return on Friday.
     Numerous resources continue to be available to residents of Hawai‘i County who suffered damage or losses from the eruption and earthquakes. As of this afternoon, 817 people have registered with the FEMA for assistance either on line or at the Disaster Recovery Center at Keaʻau High School gym, open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
     Tropic Care 2018 continues Tuesday and Wednesday with free medical, dental and eye care at Keaʻau High School gym from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Additional screening days are scheduled for the coming weeks.
     There will be a community meeting at the Pāhoa High School Cafeteria Tuesday at 5 p.m. An American Sign Language interpreter will be on hand.

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TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Tuesday, June 19, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Cooper Center19-4030 Wright Road, Volcano; Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue, Jun 19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed, Jun
e 20, noon-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu, Jun 21, 9-1pmOcean View Community Centerovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Jun 21, 6:30pmUnited Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, JUNE 22
Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Kaʻū Chapter community meeting Fri, June 22, 5pm, Pāhala Plantation House. “Come chat about agriculture in Kaʻū, local food production, ag related legislation, and make connections with folks in the community. All Kaʻū Farmers and Ranchers are encouraged to attend.” Light pupus available; welcome to bring something to share. Any questions call Raina Whiting, Kaʻū Chapter President, at 464-0799 or rainawhiting@gmail.com.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Birth of Kahuku, Sat, Jun 23, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Explore rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. nps.gov/HAVO

SUNDAY, JUNE 24
‘Ōhi‘a Lehua, Sun, Jun 24, 9:30-11am, Kahuku Unit of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Learn about vital role of ‘ōhi‘a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, and many forms of ‘ōhi‘a tree and its flower on this free, easy, one-mile walk. nps.gov/HAVO

NEW and UPCOMING
KAHUKU UNIT OF HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK has no entry fees and has announced several free programs planned for the remainder of June.
     A special talk presented by the Park’s Artist in Residence Nicholas Collier takes place at the Visitor Center on Friday, June 22, at 10 a.m.
     Park visitors are invited to participate in two upcoming ‘Ike Hana Noe ‘Au cultural demonstrative activities. Make an ‘Ohe Hana Ihu, nose flute, on Saturday, June 23, and a Mini Feather Kahili on Sunday, June 24. Both programs begin at 12:30 p.m. at the Visitor Contact Station and are made possible by Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.
     Two Ranger led hikes will also take place this weekend, both beginnings at 9:30 a.m. with participants meeting at the welcome tent. Birth of Kahuku takes place on Saturday, June 23 and ‘Ohi‘a Lehua takes place on Sunday, June 24.
     This months Coffee Talk topic for Friday, June 29, features Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund: Removing Trash, Restoring Habitat. After 15 years and 240 tons of marine debris removal Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund's president and program director, Megan Lamson, has some answers to what can be done to prevent and reduce plastic along the Ka‘ū coastline. She will share her experiences working with thousands of volunteers to restore coastal ecosystems and protect native wildlife on Hawai‘i Island. Lamson talks about some of the lessons learned, partnerships created, legislative successes, and the dedication of the Blue Whale sculpture created from ocean debris. More info about Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund can be found at wildhawaii.org. The event takes place in the Visitor Contact Station and begins at 9:30 a.m. Ka‘ū coffee, tea, and pastries available for purchase.
     Kahuku Unit Rangers, the Kahuku Cowgirls, will also walk in the Nā‘ālehu 4th of July Parade on Saturday, June 30. This event starts at 10 a.m. in the center of town on Mamalahoa Hwy.
     Ranger talks at the Visitor Contact Station continue to be available to visitors at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays and at 10:30 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.
     The entrance to Kahuku Unit is located an hour south of the main entrance on Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Kahuku is open Wednesday through Sunday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., but can be impacted by poor air quality depending on wind direction. See nps.gov/HAVO.

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ONGOING
Tropic Care 2018 - providing medical, dental, and eye care for any community member, free of charge, whether they have insurance or not - lasts through June 28, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Keaʻau High School gym. First come-first served. Bring any current prescriptions or eye glasses. Long waits are expected; bring water and snacks. Free breakfast and lunch provided to those aged 3 to 18, Monday thru Friday. Food carts may be on site for purchases throughout the event. Questions can be directed to the public health nurse at 808-974-6035, or Adria Maderios, Vice Principal of Keaʻau High School, at 313-3333.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through June 29.
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue (except Mon, June 11), 8-4:30pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through July 14, statewide and online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.
     Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.


5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.