About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, April 30, 2015

Halau Hula Kalehuaki`eki`eika`iu, under the direction of Ab Valencia, is scheduled to perform at 9:15 a.m. during Saturday's Ka`u Coffee Festival Ho`olaule`a at Pahala Community Center. Photo by Julia Neal
HALEMA`UMA`U CRATER’S LAVA LAKE level began to drop after Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists record the start of deflationary tilt around 4 a.m. today. The lava lake level had been at or near the rim of the Overlook crater over the past day, with several brief episodes of lava overflowing a short distance onto the floor of the crater. Spattering had been common along the south margin of the lake over the past day. Yesterday at noon, the lava level was measured at two yards above the floor of Halema`uma`u. This morning, the lava level dropped slightly and is now several yards below yesterday’s measurement.
Following overflows of lava onto the floor of Halema`uma`u, lava has begun
to drop into the Overlook crater. Photo from USGS/HVO
      HVO explained the current activity as “an increase in magma supply to the Kilauea Volcano magma reservoir or storage system, something that has occurred many times during the ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. Increased supply and shallow storage can explain the higher magma column in the Overlook crater, as well as the continuing inflation and elevated earthquake activity in the summit region. Higher volumes of magma moving throughout the summit and upper East Rift Zone pressurizes the reservoir and magma transport system and causes small earthquakes and inflationary tilt.”
      Regarding what the future holds, HVO said, “As long as magma supply is elevated, we expect continued high lava lake levels accompanied by additional overflows. Lava from these overflows could cover more of the Halemaʻumaʻu Crater floor, form a perched lake, or result in some combination of these two processes. Spattering or lava fountaining sources can migrate across the surface of the lava lake, as recently observed. We expect continued rockfalls, intermittent explosions and ash fall and continued high levels of gas release.
      “The evolution of unrest in the upper East Rift Zone is less certain. It is possible that a surge of lava will reach Pu`u `O`o and lava flow output will increase, both on the flanks and within the crater of Pu`u `O`o. It is also possible that lava will form a new vent at the surface. If this happens, it will most likely occur along a portion of the East Rift Zone between Pauahi Crater and Pu`u `O`o. Other outbreaks in the summit area or along either rift zone on Kilauea cannot be ruled out. If a new outbreak or surge in lava to Pu`u `O`o occurs, we will expect a drop in the summit lava lake.”
      During HVO’s close monitoring of Kilauea Volcano, scientists are especially watching for any sign of unrest that may precede a new outbreak of lava or a change in output at either Pu`u `O`o or the summit Overlook crater vent.
      See daily updates at hvo.wr.usgs.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Kalika Kastein
KA`U LEARNING ACADEMY STILL HAS openings for students to begin classes July 29. The charter school’s enrollment is currently above 80 percent, and the final lottery takes place June 30.
      Academy staff includes two recently hired teachers.
      Kalika Kastein joined the Peace Corps in 2011 as a computer literacy educator and immediately fell in love with teaching, later becoming an arts electives teacher as well. When she wasn’t teaching primary or secondary school, she worked on computer lab, library and microscope acquisition projects for local schools. After her service, Kastein worked for a community relations department at a Girl Scout World Centre in India before becoming a part of educational nonprofit WorldTeach in early 2014. With WorldTeach, she worked as an Admissions Coordinator and later as a Field Director in Chuuk, Micronesia where she not only trained and managed a team of 27 volunteer teachers, but also acted as an administrative assistant, substitute teacher and occasional bus driver for a local public school. She is a current Teach for America corps member working on her master’s in education from Johns Hopkins. She will teach English Language Arts at KLA.
Kalena Roark
      Kalena Roark is a recent graduate of Eastern Kentucky University, where she majored in elementary education and learning behavioral disabilities. Throughout her time at Eastern, Roark was extremely involved within her campus and her community. She served as vice president of several collegiate honor societies, and in her senior year was elected president of Kappa Delta Pi Teacher’s Honor Society, where she devoted her time to volunteering and improving the educational experience of others. Roark was recognized for her outstanding achievements, being awarded the Outstanding Four-Year Member Award from Student Alumni Ambassadors, also receiving awards for being the most involved and most dedicated ambassador. Her devotion to education is apparent through four consecutive years of placement on the Dean’s and President’s list, as well as honors she received upon graduating. At KLA, the current Teach for America corps member will teach Social Studies.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I STATE LEGISLATURE HAS PASSED a bill prohibiting powdered alcohol. SB 550 outlaws consumption, purchase, possession, selling, offering for sale, or otherwise distributing the substance that can be added to water to make alcoholic beverages.
      Any person who violates the law is guilty of a misdemeanor.
      The bill defines powdered alcohol as “a powdered or crystalline substance that contains any amount of alcohol for either direct use or reconstitution.”
      Ka`u’s Sens. Josh Green and Russell Ruderman, who were managers during Senate Conference on the bill, voted in favor of the ban.
      The bill now awaits Gov. David Ige’s signature.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ka`u High boys volleyball team begins BIIF play tomorrow.
Photo from Taylor's Sport Photography
FINISHING THEIR REGULAR SEASON with nine wins and four losses, Ka`u High boys volleyball team begins Big Island Interscholastic Federation play tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. at Hilo Civic Auditorium. 
      The teams traveled to Hawai`i Prep Saturday, April 25. Junior varsity won in two straight sets, 25-12 and 25-19. Varsity lost in three straight sets, 17-25, 16-25 and 10-25.
      Both teams won their only home matches in April against Wai`akea Tuesday, April 21. Junior varsity scores were 25-20 and 25-22. Varsity went to a fifth-set tie-breaker, 25-8, 22-25, 25-20, 20-25 and 15-12.
      Cameron Enriques made 29 kills, with nine in the fifth set, and Brian Gascon made 12 kills, three of them in the fifth set.
      At Ehunui Wednesday, April 15, Ka`u won in three straight sets with scores of 25-9, 25-17 and 25-16.
      Kamehameha School Hawai`i Warriors took Ka`u teammates prisoners on Monday, April 13. JV scores were 17-25 and 9-25. Varsity’s were 13-25, 19-25 and 25-27.
      On Tuesday, April 7, Ka`u took the fourth set 25-22 for a 3-1 win over Pahoa’s Daggers. Final scores: 25-19, 23-25, 25-9 and 25-22.
      The Trojans overpowered Christian Liberty Academy in three straight sets Tuesday, March 31, with scores of 25-14, 25-9 and 25-12.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

May Day is Lei Day at Volcano Art Center
MAY DAY IS LEI DAY, and Volcano Art Center celebrates tomorrow. With hundreds of fragrant blossoms and plant materials provided by the Volcano Art Center Gallery, Aunty Puna Suganuma and her `ohana share tips on sewing the perfect lei, the proper protocol of giving and receiving a lei and more.
      Volcano-area musician Wes Awana teaches local favorites and popular hapa-haole tunes on the `ukulele.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENT details are at www.kaucoffeefest.com. They continue through Sunday:

COFFEE & CATTLE DAY is tomorrow at 10 a.m. at Aikane Plantation. Participants find out how descendants of Ka`u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture. $25 includes all-you-can-eat buffet. aikaneplantation.com or 808-927-2252. See kaucoffeefest.com.

DURING KA`U STAR GAZING tomorrow from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., participants travel to the summit of Makanau to observe the heavens. $35 includes refreshments and shuttle transportation. kaucoffeemill.com or 928-0550. See kaucoffeefest.com.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL HO`OLAULE`A Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pahala Community Center features a free, full day of music, hula, Ka`u Coffee Experience, educational displays and demonstrations, farm tours, vendors and meet the farmers. See kaucoffeefest.com.

KA`U COFFEE COLLEGE on Sunday at 9 a.m. at Pahala Community Center is a free educational series featuring coffee researchers and industry professionals. Call Chris Manfredi at 929-9550. See kaucoffeefest.com.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.






See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.
See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2015.pdf.



Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologists working on the far side of Halema`uma`u captured the initial moments of the plume rising after a rockfall from the crater wall impacted the lava lake, triggering an explosion of spatter and smaller particles. Photo from USGS/HVO
AN EXPLOSION AND OVERFLOWS OF LAVA onto the floor of Halema`uma`u crater are occurring at the summit of Kilauea volcano. The lava lake level has been at or near the rim of the Overlook crater over the past day, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported. At 9:40 p.m. last night, a very small, brief overflow occurred. A larger one occurred at 2 a.m. this morning, sending lava a short distance onto the floor of Halema`uma`u, and another overflow was occurring this morning.
Overlook vent's rim used to be visible in images from HVO's thermal webcam.
Lava continues to overflow the rim this morning. Photo from USGS/HVO 
      Yesterday at around 10:20 a.m., an explosion occurred when rock fell from the wall of Halema`uma`u. Spatter and small particles fell onto the Halema`uma`u visitor overlook, which has been closed to the public since the summit eruption began in 2008.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE DRONE FLIER arrested in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park was tased by a ranger who said he feared the man might run off a cliff and fall 500 feet into the volcanic crater, according to a report from the Associated Press.
      The man, Travis Ray Flanders, from Pahoa, was with his family and flying a three-inch-drone with a camera. According to AP, the ranger asked him to stop flying the drone three times and also asked for ID. The man took off, and the ranger said he feared the man would fall off the crater rim. According to park spokesperson Jessica Ferracane, the drone camera was given back to the man’s family after his arrest.
      Released from jail the next day, Flanders faces federal charges of interfering with agency functions and operating an aircraft on undesignated land.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Skylark
EMCEES SKYLARK AND DEBBIE RYDER open Ka`u Coffee Festival Saturday at 9 a.m., with entertainment running through the day until 5 p.m. Halau Hula Kalehuaki`eki`eika`iu performs at 9:15 a.m. followed by Hands of Time at 10 a.m. and Hannah’s Makana `Ohana hula halau at 10:45 a.m. Miss Ka`u Coffee Maria Miranda and the Miss Ka`u Coffee Court will appear at 11:30 a.m. Saturday morning, also, with Miranda playing piano and her court sharing their talents.
      Afternoon performances begin with Keaiwa and Demetrius Oliveira at 12:15 p.m., followed by Halau Hula O Leionalani at 1 p.m.; Bolo, 1:45 p.m;  South Side Serenaders at 2:30 p.m., Keoki Kahumoku at 3 p.m.; Kulele  at 3:45 .p.m.. The Buy Local, It Matters drawing for a $1,000 check takes place at 4 p.m.  Moses, Makana & Bradley play at  4:15 p.m.and Kookoo Bird & Friends play at 4:45 p.m.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL RECEIVED airtime on KITV and Hawai`i News Now this morning, with organizer Chris Manfredi promoting star gazing, the plantation water system hike, the ho`olaule`a and Ka`u Coffee College. On KITV, he said people plan their vacations around the Ka`u Coffee Festival. He also showed off three Ka`u Coffee brands, Will & Grace Tabios’ The Rising Sun, Rusty’s 100 Percent Hawaiian Ka`u Coffee from Lorie Obra and Manfredi’s own Ka`u Local Products brand.
      The interviewer called Ka`u - Hawai`i at its most pristine.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

FRIENDS OF THE KA`U LIBRARIES are having a fundraiser at the ho`olaule`a Saturday. They are accepting donations of baked goods and looking for volunteers to man the booth. Drop off baked items that morning from 8 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Members close to Na`alehu Library can also drop off baked items there during working hours on Friday, and Sara will drop them off at Pahala.
      Volunteers are needed the day of the sale. Set-up begins at 8 a.m. Sales periods are 9 a.m. to 11, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., l p.m. to 3 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. (Includes packing unsold items.)
      Please package and label baked goods, indicating if nuts or fruits are included in the items for individuals who may have a food allergy.
      For additional information, call Ann Fontes at 987-7448.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE BUY LOCAL, IT MATTERS cross-promotion sponsored by Ka`u Coffee Festival and the state Department of Agriculture continues. A lucky winner receives a $1,000 check at the ho`olaule`a Saturday. 
      The campaign aims to encourage residents to support Hawai`i businesses. It particularly focuses on agriculture, encouraging conscious decisions to purchase locally grown farm products. The campaign was created by University of Hawai`i College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, Hawai`i Farm Bureau Federation and Hawai`i Department of Agriculture.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I’S U.S. CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION welcomed Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on his official visit to the United States during Japan’s Golden Week.
      To highlight the important alliance spanning seven decades between the United States and Japan, Sen. Mazie Hirono attended last night’s State Dinner for Abe at the White House hosted by President Obama and the First Lady. This morning, Hirono served on the escort committee for Abe’s address to a joint meeting of Congress. Escort Committee members have the privilege of leading the Prime Minister into the House chamber.
      “Japan is one of our closest allies, and at a time when we have so much instability elsewhere in the world, it is important to maintain stability in the Asia-Pacific,” Hirono said. “In our ongoing focus on the rebalance to the Asia-Pacific, we must continue to strengthen our relationship with Japan.
Japan-born Sen. Mazie Hirono with her mother. Photo from Sen. Hirono's office
       “I was born in Japan and lived there until I was nearly eight years old. It is an honor to attend the State Dinner and serve on the escort committee for Prime Minister Abe’s address. Our countries have much to offer one another, and we must focus on continuing our enduring relationship and strengthening that relationship to meet our shared challenges.”
      Hirono, the first Asian-American woman elected to the U.S. Senate, was born in Fukushima, Japan in 1947. She currently serves as co-chair of the Congressional Study Group on Japan.
      Rep. Tulsi Gabbard welcomed Abe in what was a historic event, the first time a Prime Minister of Japan has spoken before a joint special session of Congress. During his speech, Abe paid tribute to U.S. soldiers who lost their lives in World War II and described how moved he was during his visit to the World War II Memorial. He also took time to express how much Sen. Daniel K. Inouye “symbolized honor and achievements of Japanese-Americans.” 
      “Hawai`i has long enjoyed a special and unique relationship with Japan,” Gabbard said. “Our two nations have many areas of common concern, like fighting terrorism and defending human rights around the world. I look forward to continuing this productive dialogue and working together towards those common goals.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Participants interested in joining Na`alehu's Fourth of July parade can sign
up by Monday, June 1. Photo by William Neal
`O KA`U KAKOU IS CALLING all interested participants to sign up by Monday, June 1 to be in this year’s annual Fourth of July parade in Na`alehu. Contact Debra McIntosh at 929-9872 to register floats or parade walkers. 
      Last summer, 59 different groups and individuals marched into town in the parade, including clubs, civic groups, churches, pa`u riders, motorcycles, cars and the kiddie train.
      Following the parade, senior bingo will be held at the Na`alehu Community Center, and there will be a kids’ day in the park with inflatables and shave ice.
      “The event draws the whole community to celebrate our nation’s history,” said OKK secretary Nadine Ebert. “We expect the parade to be bigger and better this year.”
      This is the sixth year OKK has volunteered to organize the parade. OKK also held a senior bingo last month with 62 senior players. “A great time was had by all!” Ebert said.
      In January, OKK celebrated another successful Keiki Fishing Tournament with 292 registered fishermen and over 700 lunches served. “We thank everyone for their support,” said Ebert.
      OKK also takes care of the environment and additional community support with their continuous road and Punalu`u pond cleanups, numerous cemetery maintenance projects, help to Ka`u senior citizens, restoring Pahala Hongwanji and providing setup and breakdown help at the Ka`u Coffee Festival and security at the recent Miss Ka`u Coffee Scholarship Pageant.
      To become a member or support OKK’s community efforts, call Ebert at 938-5124, or email ebertn004@hawaii.rr.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Scenic Aikane Plantation hosts Coffee & Cattle Day Friday.
Photo by Tom McAlexander
KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS continue through Sunday: 

KA`U MOUNTAIN WATER SYSTEM HIKE, tomorrow at 9 a.m., has three spaces left as of this morning. Participants explore flume systems of the sugarcane era and investigate development of hydroelectric power. kaucoffemill.com or 928-0550.

COFFEE & CATTLE DAY, Friday at 10 a.m. at Aikane Plantation. Participants find out how descendants of Ka`u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture. $25 includes all-you-can-eat buffet. aikaneplantation.com or 808-927-2252.

KA`U STAR GAZING, Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., has three places left. Participants travel to the summit of Makanau to observe the heavens. $35 includes refreshments and shuttle transportation. kaucoffeemill.com or 928-0550.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL HO`OLAULE`A, Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pahala Community Center. Festival-goers enjoy a free, full day of music, hula, Ka`u Coffee Experience, educational displays and demonstrations, farm tours, vendors and meet the farmers.

KA`U COFFEE COLLEGE, Sunday at 9 a.m. at Pahala Community Center. The educational series features coffee researchers and industry professionals. Free. Call Chris Manfredi at 929-9550.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.





Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, April 28, 2015

The rising lava lake within Halema`uma`u Crater at the summit of Kilauea volcano draws thousands of additional visitors to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. NPS Photo by Mark Wasser
FLYING A DRONE OVER KILAUEA VOLCANO netted a Pahoa man a night in Hilo cellblock Saturday. He was released on bail Sunday but faces up to five years in prison and $5,000 in fines if convicted in federal court.
HVNP Public Affairs Specialist Jessica Ferracane
     The crime for which 35-year-old Travis Ray Saunders is charged is deploying an unmanned aerial vehicle over a national park, a law in place for all national parks since August 2014 “for visitor and resource protection and visitor enjoyment,” Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Public Affairs Specialist Jessica Ferracane told Hawai`i News Now.
      “The suspect refused to identify himself and fled – not far from the edge of the caldera, which is more than 500 feet,” Ferracane said. “The ranger deployed his taser to stop the fleeing suspect and then arrested the suspect for failure to comply with a lawful order and interfering with agency functions.” 
      According to Ferracane, an investigation is taking place. “Apparently the suspect was very unpredictable and very unruly, and the national park service ranger was really unclear what his next actions would be and needed to stop this individual,” she said.
      See hawaiinewsnow.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

This thermal webcam image of Halema`uma`u Crater shows areas where rock
has broken off of the crater rim, at left. Image from USGS/HVO
THOUSANDS OF ADDITIONAL VISITORS are flocking to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park to witness the enlarging lava lake steadily rise at the summit of Kilauea volcano. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that the lake briefly rose to the rim of the crater this morning but did not overflow onto the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater. 
      To ease traffic once the Jaggar Museum and Kilauea Overlook parking lots fill up, rangers are currently redirecting vehicles during peak visitation hours to park at the Kilauea Military Camp ball field. From there, visitors can hike one mile to Jaggar Museum observation deck, the closest and best vantage point to view the lava lake.
      “Visitors should come prepared to ensure a safe and enjoyable park experience,” said Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “We encourage people to avoid peak hours and arrive after 10 p.m. and before 4 a.m. if possible, or they will likely wait in line for parking.”
      The park remains open 24 hours a day. 
      NPS offers more tips for an optimal viewing experience:
      Be prepared to hike one mile each way between Kilauea Military Camp ball field and Jaggar Museum observation deck on Crater Rim Trail. Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes, bring rain gear, water, binoculars, a flashlight and extra batteries.
      Carpool if possible to reduce the number of vehicles in parking areas.
      As a courtesy to other visitors, no “tailgating” in Jaggar Museum or Kilauea Overlook parking lots. Choose another picnic location so others have a chance to view the eruption.
      To observe viewing and weather conditions, monitor the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory webcams. The KI camera provides a panoramic view of Halema`uma`u Crater from HVO.
      High levels of dangerous sulfur dioxide gas and volcanic ash can be blown over Jaggar Museum by southerly winds. These gases are a danger to everyone, particularly to people with heart or respiratory problems, young children and pregnant women. Kilauea Visitor Center offers updates on air quality 24 hours a day, and visitors can monitor SO2 at hiso2index.info/.
      In addition, the public is reminded that park entrance fees apply.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Visualization of TMT on Mauna Kea shows Mauna Loa in the background.
Image from tmt.org
KA`U RANCHER MICHELLE GALIMBA contributed an article to Civil Beat about her and her daughter’s views on the Thirty Meter Telescope. 
      “My daughter and I disagree, cordially, on the Thirty Meter Telescope,” Galimba wrote. “She feels that it should not be built. I feel that the discoveries that it will make possible are worth the sacrifice of the footprint and the view-plane.
      “My daughter is 13. We live on our family ranch in Ka`u on the slopes of Mauna Loa, but she goes to school at the Kamehameha campus in Kea`au. She looks up at Mauna Kea every day.
      “My daughter comes out to help me feed the orphaned calf that I am caring for. She says: ‘Let’s call him Ku, because he was born in the time that we stood up for Mauna Kea.’
      “My daughter’s opinion on this issue is extremely important to me. Her generation will face some of the most difficult challenges that any generation has faced — global climate change, resource depletion, the high point of our exponential population growth.
      “The minds, hearts and spirits of her generation are among the most critical resources on the planet. If we allow that spirit to be crushed in this debate over TMT, we will lose something infinitely more precious than knowledge of the origins of the universe, the nature of dark matter, or the habitability of distant planets.
      “The TMT, from what I understand, will be highly visible from the whole north side of the island. The presence of the telescopes unquestionably impacts the natural beauty of Mauna Kea and puts the stamp of humanity, and specifically of Western civilization and science, on the heights of the mountain.
Michelle Galimba
      “The telescopes represent, arguably, the best aspects of Western civilization and science — a passion for knowledge that transcends the merely useful or profitable. The telescopes also, arguably, represent the worst in Western civilization and science — the arrogant disregard for native value systems in the name of ‘progress.’
      “I visited Taos, New Mexico, a few years ago and was entranced by the beauty of Taos Mountain, which stands above Taos Pueblo much as Mauna Kea stands above Hawai`i Island. The people of Taos Pueblo fought for decades to get their mountain back from the federal government. The mountain itself is a powerful presence and the fact that it is pristine and inviolate is immeasurably important to the people of Taos, to the strength of their community and cultural integrity. Mauna Kea is like that.
      “Yet it is also important that we have a regulatory process by which projects such as the TMT are considered, approved or rejected, and that we honor that process. Failing to honor our own process — unwinding the clock — sets a precedent that can cut both ways. If we can unwind one decision, then any and all decisions can be unwound at any time. This is dangerous territory to traverse.
      “That does not mean there is no room for discussion at this point. The very opposite is true. How do we honor and encourage this widespread engagement with land use issues in our young people so that they will be empowered to steward our islands and our planet in the years to come? How do we ensure that our local people have a decent standard of living? What is our long-term vision for Mauna Kea? For all of Hawai`i Island? For our state?
      “What kind of civilization, what kind of culture, what kind of lives do we want to have and how do we get there? Does the science, technology and tradition of human inquiry and invention that the TMT represents have a place in our future here on Hawai`i Island? Can we reconcile the best aspects in the native traditions with the best aspects of Western civilization? 
      “I asked my daughter: ‘Well, what would you think if there was a promise to remove all of the telescopes by 2050?’ She said: ‘I would feel better about it but some people would still not like the TMT to be built. Also, it would be better if it was sooner than 2050. I’ll be really old by then, even older than you are right now.’”
      See civilbeat.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Phil and Merle Becker host Coffee & Cattle Day Friday.
Photo from Aikane Plantation
KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS continue through Sunday: 

KA`U MOUNTAIN WATER SYSTEM HIKES, Wednesday and Thursday at 9 a.m. Participants explore flume systems of the sugarcane era and investigate development of hydroelectric power. kaucoffemill.com or 928-0550.

COFFEE & CATTLE DAY, Friday at 10 a.m. at Aikane Plantation. Participants find out how descendants of Ka`u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture. $25 includes all-you-can-eat buffet. aikaneplantation.com or 808-927-2252.

KA`U STAR GAZING, Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Participants travel to the summit of Makanau to observe the heavens. $35 includes refreshments and shuttle transportation. kaucoffeemill.com or 928-0550.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL HO`OLAULE`A, Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Pahala Community Center. Festival-goers enjoy a free, full day of music, hula, Ka`u Coffee Experience, educational displays and demonstrations, farm tours, vendors and meet the farmers.

KA`U COFFEE COLLEGE, Sunday at 9 a.m. at Pahala Community Center. The educational series features coffee researchers and industry professionals. Free. Call Chris Manfredi at 929-9550.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.




See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2015.pdf.


See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, April 27, 2015

Maria Miranda, second from left, was crowned Miss Ka`u Coffee 2015 last night. First Princess is Joyce Ibasan, third from left. Second Princess is Vivien Santos, left, and Third Princess is Jennifer Tabios, right. Photo by Pamela Taylor
Maria Miranda talked about responsibility of
citizenship and won the Miss Ka`u Coffee
title last night. Photo by Jesse Tunison
MARIA MIRANDA, A COLLEGE STUDENT and daughter of Ka`u Coffee farmers Berta and Jose Miranda, won the title of Miss Ka`u Coffee last night at Pahala Community Center after winning the Talent, Evening Wear and Speech competitions. First Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess is Joyce Ibasan, who took the Miss Popularity, Congenility and Photogenic competitions. Second Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess is Vivien Santos and Third Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess is Jennifer Tabios.
      More than $7,200 in scholarships was donated by businesses, public officials and community organizations.
      Miranda won the Talent trophy playing piano, accompanied by a show of photographs of Ka`u Coffee farms on stage. Ka`u Coffee farmers Annabelle and Franklin Orcino presented the trophy and $500 in scholarships with $250 from Ka`u Specialty Coffee and Malian Lahey, $150 from County Council member Maile David and $100 from Pahala Plantation Cottages and Julia Neal.
      Miranda won the Evening Wear and Speech trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Maile and Efren Abellera. She earned $500 in scholarships, with $250 from state Sen. Josh Green and $250 from state Rep. Richard Onishi.
      Joyce Ibasan won Miss Congeniality, with trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Maria and Roberto Miranda, with a $250 scholarship from Rep. Richard Creagan.
She also won the Miss Photogenic trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Verna and Milton Dacalio and a $250 scholarship from Sen. Russell Ruderman. Ibasan also won the Miss Popularity trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Jackie and Leonardo Castaneda.
      Third Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess Jennifer Tabios took home a trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Herme and Leo Norberte and $700 in scholarships, with $600 from Friends and Family of the late Bobby Tucker and $100 from an anonymous donor in honor of the late Leiani Camba-Penera and Zaileah.
      Second Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess Vivien Santos received her crown from Pageant Director Nalani Parlin and Ka`u Coffee Festival organizer Chris Manfredi and a trophy from Lorie Obra. She received $900 in scholarships, with $500 from the Ka`u Coffee Festival Committee; $350 from Bio-Eco Hawai`i, Inc., presented by Francisco Lobos; and $50 from Damian Eatinger.
      First Miss Ka`u Coffee Princess Joyce Ibasan received her crown from Miss Ka`u Coffee Pageant Chair Gloria Camba and Roger Kaiwi, of Hawai`i Coffee Co., with a trophy from Ka`u Coffee farmer Rogelio Aquino. She received $1,500 in scholarships, with $1,000 from Hawai`i Coffee Co., presented by Roger Kaiwi and $500 from Ka`u Royal Hawaiian Coffee & Tea, LLC presented by Tyler Johansen.
Community organization and business representatives line up to give scholarships
to the winners.Left to right: Donna Masaniai, President of Ka`u Chamber of
Commerce; Lester Okazaki, manager of CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union
branches in Ka`u; Connie Koi, manager of Punalu`u Bake Shop; and
Edmund C. Olson, of Ka`u Coffee Mill and Olson Trust. Miss Ka`u
Coffee Maria Miranda receives a scepter from Miss Peaberry 2014
Madison Okimoto, a trophy from Trini and Francis Marques and a crown
 from Miss Ka`u Coffee 2014 Amery Silva. Photo by Jesse Tunison
      Miss Ka`u Coffee Queen Maria Miranda received her crown from Miss Ka`u Coffee 2014 Amery Silva and Edmund C. Olson, with a trophy presented by Ka`u Coffee farmers Trini and Francis Marques and a scepter presented by Miss Peaberry 2014 Madison Okimoto. Her $2,500 in scholarships: $1,000 presented by Sammy Stanbro and Olson Trust; $500 from CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union, presented by Lester “Mako” Okazaki; $500 from Pacific Quest; $250 from Punalu`u Bake Shop, presented by Connie Koi; and $250 from Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, presented by Donna Masaniai.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY elected a new chairman at its annual convention Saturday. Hilo resident Phil Barnes’ agenda includes engaging more young people in the political process. According to Nancy Cook Lauer, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald, Barnes also wants to bring videoconferencing of state meeting to neighbor islands.
      Barnes has lived in Hawai`i since 1998. Prior to moving, he lead Alaska’s political action committee for the National Education Association.
Activity at Kilauea's summit lava lake, which continues to rise in Halema`uma`u,
is attracting crowds to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Photo from HVO
      Barnes replaces David Tarnas, who oversaw the process of replacing Ka`u’s state Rep. Denny Coffman when he resigned. In January 2014, the party sent three nominees to Gov. Neil Abercrombie, who appointed Na`alehu resident Richard Creagan to the position.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KILAUEA’S LAVA LAKE LEVEL CONTINUES to rise as the summit slowly inflates. Inflation started on Tuesday, April 21. The lake rose to about seven feet below the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater this morning. Also, according to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, seismic activity beneath Kilauea’s summit and upper East Rift Zone remains elevated. 
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ka`u's state Sen. Josh Green is Majority Floor Leader.
Photo from the senator's Facebook page
HAWAI`I STATE LAWMAKERS are holding conferences to finalize bills passed by the House and Senate prior to adjournment on Thursday, May 7. 
      Sen. Josh Green said, “As we head down the home stretch of the 2015 legislative session, I’ll be focused on reforming our community hospital system, providing insurance for people with autism, finalizing details for a medical marijuana dispensary program that will work for all of Hawai`i’s patients and several bills that enhance our society’s safety net.
      “Thank you all for your commitment to Hawai`i and to people everywhere who need a little extra help to make it.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

SPEAKER OF THE STATE HOUSE, Joe Souki, has asked to hear from farmers on all islands who are interested in growing hemp.
      “We need all farmers who want to grow hemp to send an email to  Souki now,” said Hemp Working Group Chair Denise Key, with Hawai`i Farmers Union United. “We must convince Speaker Souki that there is farmer support. It is up to our farmers to decide the fate of this bill, as it should be.”
      “We are at a Do-or-Die moment for industrial hemp bill HB 508. The House of Representatives needs to know that there are farmers who are interested in collaborating with University of Hawai`i to expand the research they have started for seed development and/or using industrial hemp seed as animal feed.
      According to Key, House Ag Committee Chair Clift Tsuji would like to remove the hemp language from HB 508. The bill calls for authorizing the growing of industrial hemp for certain purposes under specified conditions and appropriates funds for Department of Agriculture staff to implement the qualified feed developer grant program and assist in registration of industrial hemp growers and seed testing.
Chazlyn Fuerte Castaneda won a
Ken Wicks scholarship last year. 
      It also would establish within the livestock revitalization program a grant program for qualified producers of certain products and feed developers and appropriate funds for the feed developer grant program, reimbursements to qualified producers and feed developers for feed cost, assistance to feed developers in the planning and construction of feed mills and a survey of local feed ingredient sources.
      The bill has been rescheduled for Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Testimony emails need to be received by tomorrow by 3:30 p.m. to be considered at the meeting.
      Contact Souki at repsouki@capitol.hawaii.gov or 808-586-6100.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

APPLICATIONS FOR KA`U CHAMBER OF CHAMBER’S Ken Wicks scholarships are due this Friday, May 1. 
      High school seniors and adults seeking to re-enter the educational system are encouraged to apply. Applicants are asked to write an essay about how their educational experience will benefit Ka`u. Preference will be given to those who intend to remain in or return to Ka`u and live here.
      Scholarship money can be used for all college and vocational training and will range from $250 to $1,000. Visit kauchamber.org to download the application form. Call Lee McIntosh at 929-9872 with any questions.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ka`u Coffee Festival offers two opportunities
to star gaze from Makanau this week.
Photo by Andrew Richard Hara
A SECOND KA`U MOUNTAIN WATER SYSTEM HIKE has been scheduled for Thursday after Wednesday’s hike almost filled up. The hikes begin at 9 a.m. at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Reservations are required. See kaucoffemill.com or call 928-0550.

DURING COFFEE & CATTLE DAY Friday at 10 a.m., participants find out how descendants of Ka`u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture at Aikane Plantation. $25 includes all-you-can-eat buffet. Sign up at aikaneplantation.com or 808-927-2252.

FOR KA`U STAR GAZING, also on Friday, from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., participants travel to the summit of Makanau to observe the heavens in Ka`u’s dark skies. $35 includes refreshments and shuttle transportation.
      Reserve at kaucoffeemill.com or 928-0550.

AT KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL HO`OLAULE`A on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., festival-goers enjoy a free, full day of music, hula, Ka`u Coffee Experience, educational displays and demonstrations, farm tours, vendors and meet the farmers.

KA`U COFFEE COLLEGE is on Sunday at 9 a.m. at Pahala Community Center. The educational series features coffee researchers and industry professionals. Free. Call Chris Manfredi at 929-9550.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.








See kaucalendar.com/Directory2105.swf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.


See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2015.pdf.