About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, July 21, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Sunday, July 21, 2019

Kekuhe Kanahele at Puʻu Huluhulu where opponents of the Thirty Meter Telescope gather. See
stories below. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
DIFFERING POINTS OF VIEW IN THE HAWAIʻI COMMUNITY WILL NOT DETER BUILDING THE THIRTY METER TELESCOPE ON MAUNA KEA, according to TMT spokesperson Scott Ishikawa, who spoke with Hawaiʻi News Now on Sunday.
     Said Ishikawa, "Mauna Kea continues to be the preferred site for TMT. We have a lot of supporters in Hawaiʻi asking us not to leave, and at the same time, we know that's not going to sit well with some. There's been a lot of mixed emotions on this. I guess the main point is we're happy and relieved that everyone remains safe. That's always been our top priority."
Scott Ishikawa, spokesperson for TMT.
Image from Hawaiʻi News Now
     TMT Executive Director Ed Stone released a statement on Friday: "TMT has been very patient. We worked very long and very hard to comply with all laws and regulations. We've also worked long and hard with the community and to develop understanding and respect for the culture. We are and have been prepared to access the site, but our legal rights to access have been blocked. We don't have the power to clear the blockade. We need to depend on law enforcement to do that. It's a very difficult and urgent situation for us."
     HNN asked Ishikawa how long TMT is willing to wait. He told HNN, "This has been a really unprecedented situation, and I honestly don’t know at this point." The alternate location for the $1.4 billion telescope is the Canary Islands in Spain.

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NEW LAWSUITS OPPOSING THE THIRTY METER TELESCOPE focus on rights of kiaʻi, Protectors of Mauna Kea, and on the deployment of law enforcement from other counties to Mauna Kea Access Road. Big Island Video News reported that on Thursday, July 18, Native Hawaiian Legal Corp. filed suit on behalf of Paul Neves – a member of the Royal Order of Kamehameha, kumu hula, and a petitioner in the TMT contested case hearings – against Governor David Ige. The lawsuit seeks a "temporary suspension and stay of the enforcement, operation, and execution" of Ige's Emergency Proclamation, on the grounds that these measures are reserved for "exceptional situations involving imminent public danger and threat to Hawai‘i's population and its critical infrastructure."
     Native Hawaiian Legal Corp. issued a statement saying that the proclamation "made clear" that Ige's "intent was to enable construction of the TMT. The TMT Proclamation's dubious effect has been to prevent Kiaʻi from exercising constitutionally protected rights of free speech, free assembly, free association, and free exercise of religion on the mountain; block Kānaka (Native Hawaiians) from accessing the mountain for spiritual purposes; suspend laws enacted to maintain public lands; and criminalize legally protected traditional and customary practices."
     Native Hawaiian Legal Corp. promised to "vigorously protect Kumu Neves' constitutional rights. There is no emergency or imminent danger at Mauna Kea requiring suspension of state laws or violation of rights. The Kiaʻi at Mauna Kea are non-violent. Their occupation of the mountain, while demanding pono (righteous) stewardship of the ‘āina (land), does not pose a danger to public health or safety. Their traditional spiritual practices and exercise of constitutionally protected rights are not crimes. Their kuleana (responsibility) to honor, worship, and protect Mauna Kea is not criminal. By invoking emergency powers, Governor Ige abused the authority entrusted to him as our State's highest executive officer to violate the rights of Kānaka for the benefit of the TMT."
     The three-judge panel Circuit Court of the First Circuit in Honolulu will hear the case this Monday, July 22nd at 1 p.m.
     On Friday, E. Kalani Flores filed for a temporary restraining order and preliminary injunction "pertaining to the unauthorized use of police officers from the City & County of Honolulu and the County of Maui to facilitate the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on Mauna Kea," reported Big Island Video News.
At least two suits ask that the governor's proclamation of emergency that could bring more law enforcement
to Mauna Kea by rescinded. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     The suit contends that  county police officers are prohibited from "exercising police powers beyond their territorial jurisdiction unless such is related to an investigation which originated and commenced within their home county. The City & County of Honolulu Police and Maui County Police officers assisting the Hawaii County Police as described herein have no lawful authority as police officers on Hawaiʻi Island."
     Flores told Big Island Video News that deployment of those officers is "an unwarranted and unnecessary use of resources and personnel for a non-violent and peaceful gathering of people exercising their rights to free speech and assembly." He also said that the officer's families are under "significant burden," with the off-island deployments.

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TMT PROTESTS GREW OVER THE WEEKEND, with some 2,000 gathered at Mauna Kea Access Road. In Honolulu, a protest parade marched through Waikiki. Several marches took place on the mainland. On Monday, some tourist businesses, including several luʻau shows, plan to shut down for the day to show off Hawaiʻi without Hawaiians.

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KAʻŪ RESIDENT KAWENI MASĀNIAI-IBARRA, an anthropologist, observed and photographed the gathering place of Puʻu Huluhulu at Mauna Kea last week and sent back this report:
Kapu Aloha members are trained to keep the peace at Puʻu Huluhulu.
Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     Visitors from across the globe gathered at Maunakea this week. Supporters from neighboring islands and distant lands joined the Protectors at Maunakea access road and Puʻuhuluhulu in their movement to halt construction of the 18 story Thirty Meter Telescope. Flags from all over the world flew proudly in support on the mountain as thousands stood in solidarity with Kānaka Maoli interests.
     Cultural protocol and speeches were offered by practitioners and orators. Ceremonial welcomings proceeded for hoahānau (cousins) and hoapili (friends) of Sāmoa, Aotearoa, and Japan. Renowned hula practitioners such as Kekuhi Kanakaole and Taupouri Tangarō offered hula and oli with their hālau to welcome the visitors, and in return, songs and cultural performances were reciprocated by visiting groups. Kānaka Maoli diaspora populations also flew in from across the ocean to stand for Maunakea.
     In the midst of worldwide attention, support for the Protectors have been voiced by countless groups of people. In addition to physical presence, videos and pictures have been posted online by groups in places like the Marshall Islands, First Nation territories, and Germany. Local visitors such as Andria Tupola and members of the Hawaiʻi Fire Department also made an appearance in solidarity with the Protectors.

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KAʻŪ VOICES took to the street Thursday to demonstrate "against our Country's cruel and inhumane border detention policies and profiteering," according to member Anita Broennimann. Kaʻū Voices spent "a busy hour," with "countless shakas, smiles, and honks, a few grumpy faces, and one brave woman who stopped to ask us why we were there."
     Broennimann said a woman named Sterling gave the group a "constructive confrontation." She said Kaʻū Voices members "kept their cool and provided her with some alternative facts. In the end, I asked her to take our photo and she graciously obliged."
Border detention policies were the target of Kaʻū Voices.
Photo from Kaʻū Voices
     Broennimann also thanked Susan, the creative artist of Free the Children cage.

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COMMENTS ABOUT THE HŪ HONUA ENERGY PLANT'S REQUEST TO DRILL DEEPER injection wells are requested through Aug. 15. The state Department of Health is taking comments on whether it should grant a modification of the original approval, issued in 2018. Should DOH grant the modified approval, operation of the wells would be authorized only when DOH also issues a permit to operate.
     Over the last year, farmed eucalyptus trees near Pāhala have been harvested, in anticipation of the Hū Honua plant opening north of Hilo and burning electricity to sell to Hawaiʻi Electric Light Co.
     The comment deadline was extended from July 21 after Hū Honua provided clarification of the proposed refined groundwater model and the monitoring plan to address comments received during the first three weeks of the comment period. This revision replaces the May 16, 2019, version on pages 30-35 of the application and may be found at 19-088.r7-WYamamoto-Request-to-Deepen-Hu-Honua-Bioenergy-19-29.pdf. DOH will also consider whether to hold an additional public meeting.
     Direct any questions or comments to sdwb@doh.hawaii.gov or Ms. Joanna L. Seto, P.E., Safe Drinking Water Branch UIC Program, Uluakupu Bldg. 4, 2385 Waimano Home Road, Suite 110, Pearl City, Hawai‘i 96782-1400.

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Sen. Brian Schatz chairs the Committee on Climate
Crisis and reports cities around the country
taking significant action.
THE FIRST U.S. SENATE  HEARING OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON THE CLIMATE CRISIS, chaired by Sen. Brian Schatz, happened last Wednesday. In an email to supporters, he said, "Mayors from cities who are taking significant action to combat the impacts of climate change testified about their efforts and how the federal government can better support them. These local communities are implementing innovative solutions that also strengthen the economy and create jobs. These are the kinds of productive conversations we should be having on climate change in the U.S. Senate, and I look forward to continuing the Committee's work. As always, please contact my office in D.C. or Hawai‘i if there is anything we can do. We are here to help."

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HEAT AND GAS LINGERING AT KĪLAUEA'S LOWER EAST RIFT ZONE is discussed in this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates:
     One year ago, activity on Kīlauea Volcano was remarkably different than it is today. Lava was flowing toward the sea, robust ocean entry plumes were fumigating coastal areas, and island air quality was impacted by huge amounts of volcanic gases and particles. Homes and farms were lost, along with agricultural land and beloved landmarks. Animal rescue efforts were ongoing, with pets and livestock evacuated by land and air. At Kīlauea's summit, daily explosions and collapse events rocked nearby residents, and a large portion of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park was closed to the public.
     Now, for the first time in over three decades, Kīlauea is not erupting. At the summit of the volcano, earthquake activity is low, and most of the National Park is open for business. No lava is flowing anywhere on Kīlauea, and volcanic air pollution on the island is the lowest it's been since the early 1980s. 
     However, there are lingering issues in some areas near the 2018 eruptive fissures. Although lava is no longer erupting, residual heat and small amounts of gas continue to escape from ground cracks and vents as subsurface molten rock, perhaps only several hundred feet underground, continues to cool.
Although Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption is over, residual heat, steam, and small amounts of 
other gases continue to escape from ground cracks and vents in the lower Puna area near Highway 130 as 
molten rock underground cools. USGS photo by C. Parcheta
     As small new cracks open in response to magma cooling, groundwater infiltrates areas of remaining heat, releasing steam, water vapor, and small amounts of other gases. Currently, areas adjacent to and uprift, west, of Highway 130 are particularly impacted by this residual heat and steam. These areas of elevated temperature may migrate, as cooling and groundwater movement continue.
     In steaming areas near and uprift of the now inactive fissures, slightly elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide gases have been detected. While these gases may be released from cooling magma, they are also generated by decaying organic matter, or, in the case of CO2, from burning or smoldering vegetation.
     Thus, some portion of the H2S and CO2 is likely generated from the increased temperatures affecting plants in the area. Vegetation heated in the absence of oxygen, a process known as pyrolysis, can form organic compounds, which may be responsible for the 'chemical' odor frequently detected in these steamy areas.    
     Importantly, current H2S concentrations are very low – at or below the minimum detection level of volcanic gas monitoring instruments, which is 0.5 parts per million. People can usually smell the rotten egg odor of H2S at much lower concentrations—ranging from 0.0005 to 0.3 ppm. Hydrogen sulfide is present in the LERZ in tiny amounts, but that little bit can be quite noticeable.
    Based on the odor threshold, the state of Hawaiʻi has set a "nuisance level" for H2S at 0.025 ppm. However, negative symptoms of H2S exposure do not occur until concentrations are well above this level.
     According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), prolonged exposure to 2‒5 ppm H2S may cause headaches, eye irritation, nausea or breathing problems in some asthmatics. This is many times the concentrations currently measured near the LERZ thermal features.
     Carbon dioxide concentrations in some LERZ steaming areas are elevated above the background atmospheric concentration of 412 ppm, 2018 global average. While the air in a crowded meeting room can frequently exceed 1,000 ppm CO2, maximum concentrations measured in the LERZ are well below this level. OSHA has established an exposure limit for CO2 of 5,000 ppm averaged over an 8-hour work day.
     Based on the history of previous eruptions, elevated temperatures and steam are likely to persist in the area for many years. The 1955 LERZ eruption produced thermal features that have been active for over 60 years, some of which are used as natural saunas. Even in the early 1990s, a temperature of 51 degrees Celsius, 131 degrees Fahrenheit, was measured in a 1955 vent, but no volcanic sulfur gases, such as H2S, were detected. See pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/ofr94569.
     The 1955 and 2018 LERZ eruptions share some similarities, but exactly where and how long heating and steaming will continue for any area is impossible to determine. Eventually, however, lingering surface activity related to the 2018 intrusion will begin its long, slow decline.
    See more info on volcanic gases at VOG Dashboard, vog.ivhhn.org. See more on specific health questions at Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office of the Hawai‘i Department of Health, eha-web.doh.hawaii.gov/eha-cma/Org/HEER.
     Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Liberty

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, JULY 23
Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, July 23 (Committees), Wednesday, July 24, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

HOVE Road Maintenance Board Mtg., Tuesday, July 23, 10a.m., HOVE Road Maintenance office. 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com, hoveroad.com

After Dark in the Park - A Rock in the Park: Tale of the Wanderer, Tuesday, July 23, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Join historian Hugh Montgomery and actor Dick Hershberger in a two-man play that brings the epic tale of a rediscovered rock within the Park and the voyages of Benjamin Boyd to life. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24
Kāhili Demonstration, Wednesday, July 24, 10a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Create a small kāhili pa‘a lima, a handheld feather standard. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, JULY 25
Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, July 25, 3-4p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for all community members to come together as equal partners to discuss and positively affect multiple systems' issues for the benefit of all students, families, and communities. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, July 25, 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, JULY 26
Coffee Talk at Kahuku, Friday, July 26, 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

SATURDAY, JULY 27
Volcano's ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua Half Marathon, 7 a.m., 5K, 7:15 a.m., and Keiki Dash, 10 a.m.. Races begin and end at Volcano School of Arts & Sciences Campus on Haunani Road. Half Marathon, along road - $75/person until July 25; $85 July 26-27. 5K, along road - $40/person until July 25; $45/person July 26-27. Keiki Dash, grassy field, $10/child - ages 6 and under run 300 meters; ages 7-10 years old run 600 meters. No T-shirts given for Keiki Dash. Register at webscorer.com/register?raceid=175619. ohialehuahalf.com

Experience Volcano Festival, Saturday, July 27, and Sunday, July 28, multiple locations in Volcano. Features art, food, music, and performances. More details at experiencevolcano.com
Bingo, Saturday, July 27, 9-11a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Prize donations needed. stjudeshawaii.org

Arts & Tea Culture Workshop Series #3, Saturday, July 27, 1-4p.m., Volcano Art Center. Requires minimum of 6 participants to be held. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Grand Slam performance, Saturday, July 27, 7-10p.m., Kīlauea Military Theater. Cover charge taken at door. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

SUNDAY, JULY 28
A Meeting to Establish Child Care for Kaʻū Coffee Farm Workers happens Sunday, July 28 at 3 p.m. at the Kaʻū District Gym Activity Room. Farmers and other supporters of the effort met July 13.
     With the increasing employment of members of Kaʻū's Marshallese community to pick Kaʻū Coffee, organizers in the coffee producing community, led by Laura Diaz, have established a nonprofit organization called Keiki OʻPalehua ʻOhana Program. The group has completed renovations of a room in the Pāhala Hongwanji Schoolhouse, with educational supplies for up to 15 keiki.
     Diaz said the program is looking for an electrician to hang two ceiling fans at the childcare center, for some kind of food service for the keiki, and other donations. A grand opening is planned for Aug. 10.
     Call Diaz at 928-8188 or 408-306-5596.

ONGOING
ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register before Thursday, July 25 for lower entry fees. See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Drama & Entertainment Network's Summer Musical: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Flower Drum Song, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., through July 28 at Kīlauea Military Camp's Kīlauea Theater. Tickets are available at Kīlauea General Store, Kea‘au Natural Foods, Basically Books, The Most Irresistible Shop, and at door. $20/general admission, $15/student or over 60, $12/age 12 and under. Park entrance fees may apply. 982-7344, kden73@aol.com, kden.org

Enroll at Volcano School of Arts and Sciences for the 2019-2020 school year, which starts Aug. 5; orientation for new students is Aug. 2. Spaces are available in 1st through 8th grades of the expanding Kula ‘Amakihi Community-Based Education (CBE) Program; the school may also have space or short wait lists for certain grades in the regular on-campus programs. Contact 808-985-9800 or email enrollment@volcanoschool.net to enroll.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Sunday, Aug. 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

Enroll in Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Orientation for enrolled families begins Aug. 5 & 6, with programs continuing following week in Nā‘ālehu on Monday & Wednesday, 8:45-10:45am, and Pāhala, Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30-10:30am. Space is limited. pidfoundation.org


6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

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Saturday, July 20, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Saturday, July 20, 2019

Protectors of Mauna Kea fly flags and signs in Ocean View on Friday. Photo by Yvette Slack
PROTECTORS OF MAUNA KEA DREW SOME 1,600 PEOPLE THIS WEEKEND to Puʻu Honua o Puʻu Huluhulu near the Mauna Kea Access Road. Puʻu Huluhulu has become a gathering place for those opposing construction of the giant Thirty Meter Telescope near the summit of Mauan Kea. In Kaʻū, Protectors flew flags and held signs for their cause on Friday in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu.
     The Protectors, called kiaʻi, are blocking Mauna Kea Access Road, to prevent equipment from traveling to the TMT construction site. For their own base camp, the Protectors brought in portable restrooms and food service - some Protectors have camped there or stayed in their vehicles nearby since last weekend.
     The Thirty Meter Telescope, the largest telescope on the planet, was cleared for construction after a ten year legal battle. Staging construction was scheduled to begin last Monday.
     Mayor Harry Kim visited Puʻu Huluhulu today and said he respected the Protectors' nonviolent behavior. He said "this could've turned ugly a long time ago."
Friday sign waiving in Nāʻālehu to Aloha ʻĀina - love the land and to Protect Mauna Loa. Photo by Yvette Slack
     The mayor said he supports construction of TMT, but "I wish it was different… I understand what you're saying, and I hope you understand that I feel a little bit of what you're saying… We all see different things, but I'll tell you how I feel: For the first time in my 80 years of life, I see a group of people finally coming together to feel proud of being who you are, because you are the most beautiful, warmest, givingest people on God's Earth."
     Community leaders from around the state also visited the Protectors at Mauna Kea to determine for themselves whether Gov. David Ige's emergency proclamation regarding safety issues connected to the protest was well founded. Honolulu City Council member Heidi Tsuneyoshi said, "I do not see a state of emergency. I actually see a state of humanity." She said the Protectors are well organized, "and the feeling that is here is one of peace and harmony, and something that we can all learn from."
Mauna Kea Protectors at Nāʻālehu Theatre. Photo by Yvette Slack
     On Thursday, kūpuna helping to direct the peaceful gatherings talked to the media, some of them having been arrested for blocking the Mauna Kea Access Road. 
     Walter Ritte, a kiaʻi kūpuna, charged that the governor is "abusing his powers. He's making all of us look bad, in front of the whole world. This is not a volcano that's erupting, or some kind of a huge protest that is out of control."
     Ritte is known for the successful protest to stop the military bombing of the Hawaiian Island of Kahoʻolawe in the 1970s.
     Kumu Hula Victoria Holt Takamine, of Oʻahu, said she and others living on Oʻahu are passionate about the TMT issue. She flew to Hawaiʻi Island to join the Protectors and teach hula at  Puʻu Huluhulu.
     The kumu said the governor's emergency proclamation upset her, as he referred to the indigenous people "illegally occupying" the Mauna. She said that pushed her to declare a state of emergency for the nation of Hawaiʻi: "We are now in a state of emergency, in Kapu Aloha."
Gathering at Puʻu Huluhulu. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     Another kupuna, Billy Freitas, said it is important to remember the sacrifices of "our last queen," Liliʻioukalani, "to allow us to prove to the nations of the world that we still exist as a Hawaiian kingdom… If our Lāhui rises up, remind ourselves of Kapu Aloha," which he said means "we stand in truth."
     Another kupuna announced websites that support the efforts of kiaʻi include hawaiicommunitybailfund.org, kahea.org, Puʻu Honua O Puʻu Huluhulu, mkea.info, and more. See the video at Big Island Video News.

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PARKING RULES NEAR MAUNA KEA ACCESS ROAD along Daniel K. Inouye Highway, will be enforced, warns Hawaiʻi County Police Department. "Hawaiʻi County Code 24-202 addresses parking on Federal-aid highways and prohibits vehicle parking for longer than sixty-minutes between the hours of 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. Where parking is permitted, all parking shall be parallel to the pavement with all wheels entirely off the traveled way. Violations are subject to being cited and potentially towed," reads the announcement. "Police are asking for the public's cooperation to mitigate traffic collisions and congestion along Daniel K. Inouye Highway."

Dance is a regular occurrence at the Protectors of Mauna Kea gatherings. Photo by Big Island Video News
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SHUTDOWN OF ACCESS TO MAUNA KEA is affecting local businesses. Mauna Kea Summit Adventures owner Pat Wright told Hawaiʻi News Now that his company's sunset and stargazing tours account for 100 percent of his business. He told HNN, "The gross revenue loss is around $31,000 as of today." Eight businesses have permits to take tours up the access road to Mauna Kea, reports HNN.
     HNN reports Wright is a neutral party in the fight between proponents and opponents of the Thirty Meter Telescope. However, he told HNN his business, open since 1982, could close if the access road remains closed. "I wouldn't call that a stretch at all. I'd call that a real possibility. You can't run a business when you can't open a door," said Wright.

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ASTRONOMERS ARE AFFECTED BY THE MAUNA KEA Access Road shutdown. They said that while the humans can work remotely, the telescopes need maintenance in order to continue their research.
     A group of Mauna Kea observatory directors wrote a letter, released Friday, to "offer a perspective about the Maunakea situation with the sincere hope that our words encourage greater understanding of the complex circumstances in which we find ourselves." They wrote on behalf of about 500 people, employed by Maunakea Observatories, "many of whom are born and raised in Hawaiʻi, feel a deep and personal connection to the special people and place of our Hawai‘i Island home. We live and work together in a community where our success is measured by the quality of our relationships…
Billy Freitas in red, left, sits next to Walter Ritte. Standing, in the white cap,
Victoria Holt Takamine is surrounded by other kūpuna.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     "The diverse mix of scientists, technicians, engineers, administrators, and students of the Maunakea Observatories continually seek a path forward that strengthens the future of our island community. Our local staff, family members, and friends have a wide range of views and strong feelings about the events that surround us. We deeply respect all these viewpoints, which come from our family and friends, and we both believe and champion their right to express them."
     They wrote about the disagreements that will take "mutual respect and time to heal. We know these challenges across our island home have gained attention with our peers in the international astronomy community… The future of Maunakea astronomy will be defined primarily by the diverse people of Hawaiʻi.
     "The vast majority of island residents support the Maunakea Observatories, who have been part of this community for more than 50 years. Conflict about the Thirty Meter Telescope does not change the long-standing support our Observatories have earned, but it will undoubtedly influence its future. For the benefit of the people who work on the mountain, for those who practice their culture and religion on the mountain, we look to a future beyond coexistence because that still implies barriers. We look to a future in which knowledge and worldviews hybridize to create a reality more beautiful and resilient than its progenitors.
Men and women in motion as they practice non-violent hula resistance at Mauna Kea. Photo by Big Island Video News
     "This is beginning already, through A Hua He Inoa, the interstellar asteroid ‘Oumuamua, black hole Pōwehi, and the unusual asteroids recently officially named Kamo‘oalewa and Ka‘epaoka‘awela by Hawaiian students. We look to a future for Maunakea where studies of the universe are buoyed by the wisdom of Hawaiian kūpuna and grounded in the richness of Hawaiian culture. We are nurturing this future now as devoted members of the Hawaiʻi Island and international astronomy communities. We ask for the informed understanding and support of our international astronomy community to uphold this vision, which we believe will be an important part of everyone's future."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REP. TULSI GABBARD JOINED PROTESTERS IN PUERTO RICO ON FRIDAY. They are calling for Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello to resign. Gabbard said the "hundreds of thousands of protesters" have only received "dismissive platitudes" from Roselló, who is "ignoring their cries for an end to corruption."
     She said there is "rampant corruption" within Puerto Rico's government that "pretends to serve the interests of its people but instead exploits them, over and over again, for profits and power. It is this blatant corruption that undermines people's faith in our democracy, our country, and our values."
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard in Puerto Rico.
Photo from CNN
     Gabbard said Puerto Rico is "an example of how decades of neglect by those in power, who put their own selfish interests ahead of the well-being of the people, and who put profits and politics ahead of the needs of its citizens, erodes faith in our democracy and causes widespread suffering. This isn't something people only experience in Puerto Rico. Across the country, we share their sense of injustice. We know what it feels like for our voices to go unheard – in San Juan, on Wall Street and in Washington D.C.
     "That's why I'm here: to support the people taking action to end a multibillion-dollar corruption network involving kickbacks for lobbyists and state officials, preferential government contracts, and use of public resources to do partisan work. 
     "I'm here to stand with my fellow Americans in Puerto Rico calling for the resignation of a corrupt Governor who has shown he is for himself, rather than for the people. I call on every Democratic candidate running for President to come here and stand with our fellow Americans in Puerto Rico against corruption.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Liberty

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
SUNDAY, JULY 21
Ka‘ū Chamber of Commerce Mtg., Sunday, July 21, 4-6p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JULY 23
Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, July 23 (Committees), Wednesday, July 24, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

HOVE Road Maintenance Board Mtg., Tuesday, July 23, 10a.m., HOVE Road Maintenance office. 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com, hoveroad.com

After Dark in the Park - A Rock in the Park: Tale of the Wanderer, Tuesday, July 23, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Join historian Hugh Montgomery and actor Dick Hershberger in a two-man play that brings the epic tale of a rediscovered rock within the Park and the voyages of Benjamin Boyd to life. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24
Kāhili Demonstration, Wednesday, July 24, 10a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Create a small kāhili pa‘a lima, a handheld feather standard. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

 THURSDAY, JULY 25
Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, July 25, 3-4p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for all community members to come together as equal partners to discuss and positively affect multiple systems' issues for the benefit of all students, families, and communities. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, July 25, 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, JULY 26
Coffee Talk at Kahuku, Friday, July 26, 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

SATURDAY, JULY 27
Volcano's ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua Half Marathon, 7 a.m., 5K, 7:15 a.m., and Keiki Dash, 10 a.m.. Races begin and end at Volcano School of Arts & Sciences Campus on Haunani Road. Half Marathon, along road - $75/person until July 25; $85 July 26-27. 5K, along road - $40/person until July 25; $45/person July 26-27. Keiki Dash, grassy field, $10/child - ages 6 and under run 300 meters; ages 7-10 years old run 600 meters. No T-shirts given for Keiki Dash. Register at webscorer.com/register?raceid=175619. ohialehuahalf.com

Experience Volcano Festival, Saturday, July 27, and Sunday, July 28, multiple locations in Volcano. Features art, food, music, and performances. More details at experiencevolcano.com
Bingo, Saturday, July 27, 9-11a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Prize donations needed. stjudeshawaii.org

Arts & Tea Culture Workshop Series #3, Saturday, July 27, 1-4p.m., Volcano Art Center. Requires minimum of 6 participants to be held. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Grand Slam performance, Saturday, July 27, 7-10p.m., Kīlauea Military Theater. Cover charge taken at door. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

ONGOING
ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register before Thursday, July 25 for lower entry fees. See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Drama & Entertainment Network's Summer Musical: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Flower Drum Song, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., through July 28 at Kīlauea Military Camp's Kīlauea Theater. Tickets are available at Kīlauea General Store, Kea‘au Natural Foods, Basically Books, The Most Irresistible Shop, and at door. $20/general admission, $15/student or over 60, $12/age 12 and under. Park entrance fees may apply. 982-7344, kden73@aol.com, kden.org

Enroll at Volcano School of Arts and Sciences for the 2019-2020 school year, which starts Aug. 5; orientation for new students is Aug. 2. Spaces are available in 1st through 8th grades of the expanding Kula ‘Amakihi Community-Based Education (CBE) Program; the school may also have space or short wait lists for certain grades in the regular on-campus programs. Contact 808-985-9800 or email enrollment@volcanoschool.net to enroll.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Sunday, Aug. 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org


Enroll in Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool.
 Orientation for enrolled families begins Aug. 5 & 6, with programs continuing following week in Nā‘ālehu on Monday & Wednesday, 8:45-10:45am, and Pāhala, Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30-10:30am. Space is limited. pidfoundation.org

6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.




Friday, July 19, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Friday, July 19, 2019

Law enforcement vehicles and the sovereignty flag at Mauna Kea, where a peaceful gathering of those opposed
to construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope continues. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
THE MAUNA KEA STANDOFF drew Sen. Bernie Sanders, Sen. Mazie Hirono, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, Rep. Ed Case, and Lt. Gov. Josh Green to voice their opinions this week. The elected officials addressed the Protectors of Mauna Kea's efforts to preserve the top of the mountain as a cultural site, while the scientific community plans to construct the Thirty Meter Telescope to carry out the most sophisticated deep space research to date. The public officials commended on the Protectors' nonviolent practices, which included arrests by law enforcement officers on Tuesday, as Protectors blocked the Mauna Kea Access Road. The vigil continued into its fifth day on Friday with little interaction with police. TMT staff had planned to begin construction of the telescope on Monday.
     Bernie Sanders, who is running for U.S. President, said, "We must guarantee native peoples' right to self-determination and their right to protest. I stand with Native Hawaiians who are peacefully demonstrating to protect their sacred mountain of Mauna Kea."
     The other presidential candidate who commented is Kaʻū's member of the House of Representatives. Tulsi Gabbard urged Gov. David Ige to withdraw the emergency declaration that he proclaimed yesterday when he announced security concerns. Gabbard, like Sen. Kai Kahele (See Thursday's Kaʻū News Briefs), called for a moratorium on TMT construction. She asked the governor to "delay any new construction, and bring leaders together from both sides in the spirit of aloha to hoʻoponopono and determine the best path forward. The people of a given ʻāina must have a role to play in what happens in their ʻāina."
The Protectors of Mauna Kea established a refuge site at Puʻu Huluhulu. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     Though TMT may have the legal right to proceed, there are "spiritual and cultural issues that have not been addressed. This is about something much greater than the TMT project — it has to do with longstanding history on Mauna Kea, broken promises, desecration of sacred land, and disrespect for native culture," said the congresswoman. "While no one can change the past, now is the time for leaders to build a new, just path for the future. Trust must be earned — it is wrong that state leaders have approved the development of a new telescope on a new site on Mauna Kea, without first ensuring the timely removal of decommissioned facilities along with full restoration of those sites. This failure and a history of broken promises has resulted in the standoff that we are seeing today, and the lack of trust that government promises to respect the ʻāina and sacred places will be kept."
     Gabbard said that "To many Native Hawaiians, kamaʻāina, and malihini alike, Mauna Kea is so much more than a mountain. It's a revered and sacred sanctuary connecting keiki and kūpuna to the past, present and future, and where Native Hawaiians practice their customs and traditions.
     "The materialistic way that developers and corporations are viewing Mauna Kea — ignoring the spiritual significance and relationship many Native Hawaiians have with the Mauna — is at the heart of the problem… Mauna Kea has been a source of spiritual inspiration for so many generations, and will continue to offer that inspiration in the future, if it is not desecrated by those whose hearts are too hard to appreciate the value of the unseen transcendental/spiritual reality that is not visible to our physical eyes."
Protectors of Mauna Kea learned techniques of peaceful resistance. Elected officials applauded them for
their nonviolent approach. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     She said it is "hypocritical" that many who support TMT "speak of their own spiritual quest for knowledge and wisdom, while simultaneously closing their eyes to the spiritual inspiration and significance that Mauna Kea offers — not only to Native Hawaiians but to humanity at large. Spiritual nourishment and inspiration is of much greater and lasting value than anything money can buy." She said "this spiritual blindness" is often born out of arrogance or greed, and is at the root of the "desecration of our precious environment. Ua mau ke ea o ka ʻāina i ka pono. The life of the land is perpetuated in righteousness. This shouldn't be just a slogan. It must be our way of life."
     Mazie Hirono said, "I am concerned for the safety of the protectors, including kūpuna, who are exercising their constitutional right to peacefully protest at Mauna Kea. This project has undergone a significant and thorough regulatory and legal review, and I respect that process."
     Ed Case, who formerly represented Kaʻū in congress, and now represents urban Oʻahu, said, "I support the continuation of world-class astronomy on Mauna Kea, including completion of the TMT, together with the commitment to the removal of five current telescopes to broader community engagement."
     Josh Green, a physician who represented west Kaʻū as state senator before his election to lieutenant governor, said,  "First and most important in my opinion, there must not be any violence on Mauna Kea. That would cause irreparable damage to our state and people, culturally and spiritually."
Men learned to maintain a nonaggressive approach in order to keep a calm relationship with law enforcement
during the gatherings near the Mauna Kea Access Road. Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
     Responding to the governor's emergency proclamation, which would allow the state to call in the National Guard, Green said he respects the Protectors of Mauna Kea's peaceful approach to date. The National Guard "should only be used when there is no other way to protect life and safety.  
     "I believe that this struggle is more about the heart of Hawaiʻi and our sense of self and dignity, especially for the Hawaiian people, than it is about a telescope. It is about cultural recognition and people's self worth. Know that I will always put safety, health, and human growth above any project.
     Said Green, "I also know that all voices, pro and con, should be heard, and that is how I will approach this period in our state's beautiful history."
     Green said he will meet with anyone "with any view on this critical issue for Hawaiʻi. I will meet people where they fight for liberty, on the mountain if asked, on the streets, in my office (which is your office, too), on long walks, wherever necessary. I do this because if there is some path to harmony, we should find it together." He emphasized that "no single project, not any, is important enough to allow ourselves to damage the fabric of our ʻOhana in Hawaiʻi. Please continue to embrace one another with love and respect, peacefully, no matter what your position is on the TMT and the sacred mountain."
     He gave his cell phone number, (808)937-0991, for members of the public to contact him.

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Protectors of Mauna Kea.
Photo by Kaweni Māsaniai-Ibarra
SAFETY IS THE TOP PRIORITY, said Protectors of Mauna Kea. As part of daily safety briefings this week, kiaʻi offered their manaʻo, beliefs, and expectations of conduct for the mauna. On Friday morning, leaders stressed the importance of minimal impact on the environment and practicing peaceful ceremonies. Pua Case, Kahoʻokahi Kanuha, and Kaleikoa Kāʻeo were among those who offered speeches in preparation.
     A gracefully organized crowd listened as the kiaʻi laid out expectations and protocol for de-escalating situations, and peacefully interacting with law enforcement and military personnel.‪ "When they come in with pepper spray, mace, and LRADs, all we singing is love, love, love... aloha, e aloha e," said Kahoʻokahi when stressing the importance of language use in situations.
     Protectors pointed out that Gov. David Ige declared a state of emergency this week, mobilizing law enforcement and military personnel. Protectors said they are prepared to remain peaceful and practice Kapu Aloha in every way possible. See tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us
on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GOV. DAVID IGE HELD A TMT AND MAUNA KEA press conference in Hilo this afternoon. After meeting with Mayor Harry Kim and other local officials, Ige said he will continue the state of emergency, but is not inclined to call in the National Guard.
     He said, "I spent the afternoon meeting with Mayor Kim and others to discuss the way forward with the Thirty Meter Telescope project. My number one priority has been and continues to be the safety of all people. I am committed to avoiding violence by anyone and keeping everyone safe. Because of this, I have decided not to escalate the situation by calling in additional National Guard troops at this time. I have never, ever, considered using tear gas at Mauna Kea.
Gov. David Ige in Hilo today.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     "However, there are thousands of people on the mountain and I encourage all to remain respectful and calm. There are inadequate bathroom and rubbish facilities for this many people, and we are seeing the impacts on the environment. Pedestrians are running back and forth across a major highway, at night, and in bad weather when visibility is poor. There are reports of drugs and alcohol use.
     "There are many groups, and they don't all agree about why they are there, or what they intend to do. Leaders of the Puʻuhonua have not been able to maintain order and the neutral terms of the Puʻuhonua. The emergency proclamation remains in effect because of this unsafe situation. This is a complicated set of issues and the emotions are fueled by a desire for many things. Some of these issues we can work towards, some we can not. But I remain committed to finding those places of common ground.
     "Both the mayor and I have had many discussions with many people, but many of the leaders of this protest do not want to meet. They would rather post to social media, spread rumors and fear, rather than engage in real world conversations about how we move forward together. Right now I am asking the leaders of this protest to commit to keeping everyone safe, to working together towards the many issues that are fueling the protest. We have lots to do. I will continue these conversations and I encourage others to join in the conversations, to talk about the many issues surrounding Mauna Kea."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Liberty

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
SATURDAY, JULY 20
Free Haircuts, Saturday, July 20, St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Kady and Drew Foster. Sign-up sheet on church bulletin board. stjudeshawaii.org

Giving Tree, Saturday, July 20, lower parking lot, St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Free clothing and self care items. stjudeshawaii.org

Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Data Survey and Clean-up at Kamilo, Saturday, July 20. Free; donations appreciated. Full - waitlist only. RSVP required. 769-7629, kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com

Mobile Spay & Neuter Waggin', Saturday, July 20, 7:30a.m.-4p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Low income pet parents and those with limited transportation qualify for mobile spay/neuter service. Free. Surgery by phone appointment only. Hawai‘i Island Humane Society, 796-0107, hihs.org

3rd Annual Ka‘ū Multicultural Society Pig Hunt, Saturday, July 20, weigh-in open 10 a.m.-5p.m., parking lot adjacent to 96-3258 Maile Street, Pāhala, near old Radio Station Building. Food booths and variety of contest categories. Kalani Vierra, 938-2005, Darlyne Vierra, 6408740, or Liz Kuluwaimaka, 339-0289

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Mtg., Saturday, July 20, 10a.m.-1p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting and training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Beginner & Intermediate Mixed Media Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, July 20, 10a.m.-2p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $25 supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Hula Kahiko - Kumu Hula Moses Kaho‘okele Crabbe with Hālauolaokalani, Saturday, July 20, 10:30-11:30a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula with Kumu Loke Kamanu & ‘Ohana, Saturday, July 20, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands-on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Ham Radio Mtg., Saturday, July 20, 2-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org
Sounds at the Summit, Desiree Moana Cruz & the Bill Nobel Quintet performance, Saturday, July 20, 5:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. Be-bop, swing, bosanova, salsa, and smooth-jazz-funk. $20/VAC member, $25/non-member. Tickets available for purchase online. Beer, wine, and pupu available for purchase at event. volcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, JULY 21
Ka‘ū Chamber of Commerce Mtg., Sunday, July 21, 4-6p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JULY 23
Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, July 23 (Committees), Wednesday, July 24, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

HOVE Road Maintenance Board Mtg., Tuesday, July 23, 10a.m., HOVE Road Maintenance office. 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com, hoveroad.com

After Dark in the Park - A Rock in the Park: Tale of the Wanderer, Tuesday, July 23, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Join historian Hugh Montgomery and actor Dick Hershberger in a two-man play that brings the epic tale of a rediscovered rock within the Park and the voyages of Benjamin Boyd to life. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 24
Kāhili Demonstration, Wednesday, July 24, 10a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Create a small kāhili pa‘a lima, a handheld feather standard. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, JULY 25
Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, July 25, 3-4p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for all community members to come together as equal partners to discuss and positively affect multiple systems' issues for the benefit of all students, families, and communities. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, July 25, 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, JULY 26
Coffee Talk at Kahuku, Friday, July 26, 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

ONGOING
ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register before Thursday, July 25 for lower entry fees. See ohialehuahalf.com.

Kīlauea Drama & Entertainment Network's Summer Musical: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Flower Drum Song, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m., through July 28 at Kīlauea Military Camp's Kīlauea Theater. Tickets are available at Kīlauea General Store, Kea‘au Natural Foods, Basically Books, The Most Irresistible Shop, and at door. $20/general admission, $15/student or over 60, $12/age 12 and under. Park entrance fees may apply. 982-7344, kden73@aol.com, kden.org

Enroll at Volcano School of Arts and Sciences for the 2019-2020 school year, which starts Aug. 5; orientation for new students is Aug. 2. Spaces are available in 1st through 8th grades of the expanding Kula ‘Amakihi Community-Based Education (CBE) Program; the school may also have space or short wait lists for certain grades in the regular on-campus programs. Contact 808-985-9800 or email enrollment@volcanoschool.net to enroll.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Sunday, Aug. 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

Enroll in Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Orientation for enrolled families begins Aug. 5 & 6, with programs continuing following week in Nā‘ālehu on Monday & Wednesday, 8:45-10:45am, and Pāhala, Tuesday & Thursday, 8:30-10:30am. Space is limited. pidfoundation.org


6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.