About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, June 03, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Sunday, June 3, 2018

The edge of Halemaʻumaʻu showing an ash covered trail that has been closed since 2008 when Kīlauea volcano began throwing 
rocks onto the overlook parking lot. Image from USGS and NPS video using an Unmanned Aircraft System.
PUNCTUATING A RECORD NUMBER 500 EARTHQUAKES in 24 hours came a 5.4 magnitude earthquake at Kīlauea summit at 3:51 p.m. today. Brian Shiro told the press this morning that 500 earthquakes over the last 24 hours represent “the highest rate ever measured there.” Shiro, a seismologist with USGS Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory, also reported “no major explosions or plume over the last day,” and the ash advisory lifted at 11 a.m.
     Soon after his report, the 5.4 earthquake rocked Volcano and sent an ash plume 8,000 feet above sea level. Civil Defense sent out a warning to look for ash in Volcano and Pāhala. As of 7 p.m., the air quality for ash and S02 remained good for both Volcano and Pāhala.
     Shiro also said that during recent days, Kīlauea summit recorded a a lot of seismic activity, in comparison with the Lower East Rift Zone, where there is very little seismic activity but lots of lava flowing, destroying homes and farms.
     
Summit plume at 8:40 a.m. on June 3. A slight mist in the
air softens the look of the plume, which is predominantly
white steam with very minor amounts of 
ashUSGS photo
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"UNPRECEDENTED" IS THE HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK CLOSURE, said park spokesperson Jessica Ferracane at the press briefing today. It's day 24 and she said the reason to keep two-thirds of the park off limits is that “increased seismicity and volcanic activity at the summit of Kīlauea” continue.
     She also reported on air quality. “Yesterday, we had extraordinarily terrible air quality… in the red for SO2 and particulates. Our minimal park staff, which are the emergency operators and law enforcement teams up there were worried about air quality and trying to work indoors and in their cars as much as possible.”
Crack, Slumping in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater
This animated GIF shows a sequence of radar amplitude images
that were acquired by the Italian Space Agency's Cosmo-SkyMed
satellite system. The images illustrate changes to the caldera
area of Kīlauea Volcano that occurred between May 5 and June 2
at 6 p.m. The last image in the sequence, from June 2, shows 
the development of several cracks outside Halema‘uma‘u and inward
slumping of a large portion of the western crater rim. The west
side of Halema‘uma‘u is clearly unstable, and it is possible 
that rockfalls and continued slumping will occur in the future.
     Air quality throughout the park and Kaʻū is determined by the emissions from Kīlauea, the active venting and lava flow in Puna and which way the wind blows.

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SO2 LEVELS VARIED THROUGHOUT KAʻŪ TODAY. SO2 levels in Pāhala were unhealthy for sensitive groups over Saturday night, going green around 8 a.m. today, and remaining good into this evening.Through 7 p.m., Ocean View S02 was reported mostly healthy and moderate ratings, with about a third of the day unhealthy for sensitive groups and a single spike of unhealthy air for 15 minutes this morning.
     Volcano's Jaggar Museum air quality was similar to Ocean View. Volcano's Visitor Center was good all morning, but strayed into air unhealthy for sensitive groups for a little over two hours today. By mid afternoon, the air was good. Kona showed little S02 all day.
     See AirNow. See Hawaiʻi Short Term SO2 Advisory. Also see the University of Hawaiʻi air quality predictions on its VMAP.

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PEOPLE OF KAʻŪ HAVE LIVED WITH ASH as far back as ancient times. During the Pāhala meeting on ash and SO2 last Wednesday, Tina Neal, Scientist in Charge of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, said, "This is a kind of an unusual time in Kīlauea's history. Those of you who have lived here a long time, you know its true."
     She explained, "We have two eruptions going on now right now. One at the summit which has changed its character very dramatically in the last month from the lava lake producing eruption that
Tina Neal, Chief Scientist at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Photo from Big Island Video News
we all enjoyed from a distance, to one where the lava lake has disappeared and withdrawn into the volcano. And now we are producing intermittent explosions of ash which is impacting you folks and communities down wind. We also have this eruption in the Lower East Rift zone in Leilani Estates area that is producing quite a bit of lava at the surface, and also erupting a great deal of gas. And that gas is also coming around the island at times and impacting your community here.
     "While this period of ash coming into Kaʻū may seem new," Neal told the Kaʻū residents, "you've been dealing with vog for ten years." She said, "This is is a very resilient part of the island. If you go back generations and generations, actually the people of Kaʻū have been dealing with ash hazards. You have a lot of ash in the hills here. When the first Hawaiians were living in this area, there were many ash explosions going on at the summit of Kīlauea. So we do know, indeed, that the people of Kaʻū have dealt with ash in the past and so we will deal with it again, in this episode, which continues."

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THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE IS HERE "to support the communities during this time that are facing hazards of ashfall as well as the S02," said Deanna Marks, who works for National Weather Service in Hilo. She spoke at last Wednesday's meeting on ash and S02 in Pāhala.
     She reported that the National Weather Service produces "two daily upper air weather balloon launches and what that does is give us a wind profile from the surface all the way up to 100,000 feet in the air. So when we do have an explosion or if we have S02 moving around in the area, we can look at our wind profiles to see where exactly that's going to move and what communities that will be affecting."
Weather balloons are launched twice a day from the Hilo National Weather
Service station to give a wind profile up to over 100,000 feet. This helps
with predictions of where ash will fall from Halemaʻumaʻu.
NWS photo
     She said additional support is coming from two weather radars on this island, one up in Kohala and one in Kaʻū. "I'm sure many of you have seen that big white ball up on the hillside there. What those are doing is sending out beams every few seconds looking for particulates in the air, same like they would look for rain showers. That's one way we can tell how high these ash clouds are making it into the air. Once we know the vertical extent of the ash plumes, we can get a better idea of where it is moving and, coupled with those wind profiles, we can let folks know where exactly the ash is going to go and where the S02 is going to go."
     She said the National Weather Service does issue special weather statements with one that's running at all times for any sort of trace of ash fall that may be affecting the area. "Once the ashfall accumulation reaches above a trace but below one quarter of an inch, we will issue an ash fall advisory. Once the ash gets above a quarter inch, we will issue an ash fall warning."
     The National Weather Service reports can be found on its website at weather.gov and NOAA Weather Radio at nws.noaa.gov/nwr.

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Photo from 7 a.m. helicopter overflight, hovering offshore and looking up the flowfront. Nearly all of the front was active and advancing and spreading; 
advance rates were estimated at an average of 250 feet/hour (76 m/hr), and as of 5:45 p.m. the flow was 245 yards from the ocean. USGS photo
A HALF MILE WIDE FRONT OF LAVA CLOSED IN ON KAPOHO BAY this evening along its devastating path through farms and homes yesterday and today. "Lava is advancing along a 0.5-mile-wide front towards the ocean at Kapoho Bay between Kapoho Beach Road and Kapoho Kai Drive. As of 5:45 PM HST, the lava flow was about 245 yards from the ocean at its closest approach point," reported Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory. At sunset, the lava was plowing through houses near the shoreline. See Ikaika Marzo's video from a helicopter.
As Fissure 8 lava flowed into Green Lake, the lake water boiled away,
sending a white 
plume high into the sky. USGS photo
     Brian Shiro, a seismologist with USGS Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory, gave an update on the activity in the Lower East Rift Zone this morning, saying “vigorous” flow from Fissure 8 is supplying a flow front.
     Shiro gave a possible answer for much-lowered seismicity in the active lava flow areas in lower Puna, where there was a 6.9 magnitude in May. “We think the conduit is open, lava is flowing freely, and it doesn’t need to break the rock - to make earthquakes - down there much anymore.”
     Shiro confirmed the plume of steam seen yesterday, June 2, at Green Lake was lava encountering then vaporizing the water in the lake. Scientists cannot say how much lava is in Green Lake, since it is not safe to go into the area. Without an estimate of the previous water depth, he said, Green Lake was “known to be deep.”

Another angle from the 7 a.m. overflight June 3. USGS photo
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HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK RANGERS ADD ANOTHER LOCATION TO SHARE PARK INFORMATION beginning June 3. Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

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CHAIN OF CRATERS EMERGENCY-ONLY EVACUATION ROAD has been cleared of the older-flow lava that was covering it, but the crews still need to roll out the road, to improve the surface. Jessica Ferracane of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park wants to emphasize this is not a road that will be open to the public; it is a one-way-out-only emergency exit.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com 
and facebook.com/kaucalendar.
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MONDAY, JUNE 4
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue/Wed, Jun 4 & 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Mon, Jun 4 & 18, 1pm, Ocean View Community Center. A parent-led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Mon, Jun 4, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JUNE 5
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue/Wed, Jun 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Volunteer Clean-Up w/Hawai‘i Outdoor Institute, Tue, Jun 5, contact in advance for meet up time at Wai‘ōhinu Park. Space limited. Free; donations appreciated. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, wildhawaii.org

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 4-6pm, Jun 19, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Wed, Jun 6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

AdvoCATS, Wed, Jun 6, 7-5pm, Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Veteran's Center, Thu, Jun 7, 8:30-12:30pm, Jun 21, 8:30-11:30am, Ocean View Community Center. VA benefits and individual counseling services. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu, Jun 7, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 9
Pancake Breakfast & Raffle, Sat, Jun 9, 8-11am, Ocean View Community Center. To volunteer, call 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Stained Glass Basics II, Sat & Sun, Jun 9 & 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sat, Jun 9, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Discover Hawaiian goddesses and the natural phenomena they represent on this free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/HAVO

Kāwā Volunteer Day, Sat, Jun 9, 9:30am, Kāwā. Sign up with James Akau, Nā Mamo o Kāwā, at namamookawa@gmail.com, jakau@nmok.org, or 561-9111. nmok.org

Zentangle: Stacks and Dangle Designs for a Dr. Seuss-Inspired Whimsical Garden, Sat, Jun 9, 10-1pm, $30/VAC Member, $35/non-Member, $10 supply fee. Basic knowledge of Zentangle recommended by not required. Register at volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222.

CANCELLED: Jazz in the Forest Concert, Sat, Jun 9. The July concert is also cancelled. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, JUNE 10
Stained Glass Basics II, Sun, Jun 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

‘Ōhi‘a Lehua, Sun, Jun 10 & 24, 9:30-11am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about vital role of ‘ōhi‘a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, and many forms of ‘ōhi‘a tree and its flower on this free, easy, one-mile walk. Free. nps.gov/HAVO


Meet Candidate Raina Whiting, candidate for state Rep., Dist. 3. Sun, June 10, 2-3:30pm, Punaluʻu Bake Shop, upper pavilion. Bring prepared, written questions for the candidate. Light refreshments provided. Questions? Ezmerelda5@gmail.com, mgw1955@gmail.com, voteRaina.com


NEW & UPCOMING
Image from advocatshawaii.org
ADVOCATS, INC., OFFERS FREE CAT SPAY AND NEUTERING on Wednesday, June 6, from 7 p.m. to 5 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center announces Ocean View Community Association. For more, visit advocatshawaii.org, or call 895-9283. For more about Ocean View Community Association, visit ovcahi.org.

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ONGOING
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through Jun 29 (closed Jun 11).
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue, 8-1pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through Jul 14, statewide & online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, & adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. Call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, Aug 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases Aug. 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.

5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

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