About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Monday, June 27, 2016

Preservation of Kauleoli fishing village and apuhua`a in South Kona also includes Ala Kahakai National
Historic Trail, which extends from Kohala south through Ka`u and then north into Puna.
Photo from Trust for Public Land
ALA KAHAKAI NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL is adding more to its jurisdiction in South Kona. Bret Yager, of West Hawai`i Today, reported that the Trust for Public Land helped the organization attain 59 coastal acres south of Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park from willing sellers, and escrow is expected to close next month. It’s Ala Kahakai’s first land purchase.
Ka`u's section of Ala Kahakai is longer than those of other districts.
Photo by Julia Neal
      The landscape envelopes the entire shoreline of Kauleoli ahupua`a, a well-preserved section of the trail and numerous ancient sites at Kauleoli fishing village, such as Hawaiian house foundations, a canoe shed, traditional agriculture areas and salt making ponds.
      The purchase will connect the property to the southern border of Pu`uhonua O Honaunau at the ancient fishing village of Ki`ilea, which was added to the park in 2006, also with assistance from TPL. It will further protect the park and “support continuation of traditions and stories of this treasured South Kona cultural landscape,” according to a statement from TPL.
      “The lineal descendants of the area have been caring for the trail,” Laura Kaakua, native lands project manager for the Trust For Public Land, told Yager. “Now, under ownership of Ala Kahakai, the trail but also the makai lands will have educational, cultural and stewardship opportunities not just for the descendants but anyone who is interested in volunteering.”
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
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U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO, WHO REPRESENTS Ka`u in the U.S. Senate, today applauded the Supreme Court’s 5-3 decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, which struck down a Texas law restricting access to reproductive health care. Had the Court ruled in favor of the Texas law, states across the nation could have enacted similarly restrictive laws.
      Hirono joined her Senate colleagues on an amicus brief to the Supreme Court urging the justices to rule in favor of the plaintiff, Whole Woman’s Health, and to preserve access to reproductive health care services.
      “Earlier this year, when the Supreme Court was hearing Whole Woman’s Health, I joined advocates on the Court steps who were holding signs that read ‘Don’t mess with access,’ and ‘Respect my fundamental human dignity,’” Hirono said. “The Court heard their plea and saw the Texas law for what it really was: an unconstitutional restriction on a woman’s right to access reproductive health care. Significantly, the Court looked at the real effect of the Texas law – which was to restrict access to critical health care services – instead of limiting its review to the state’s ostensible justification.
      “Texas, however, is only one state out of many which has enacted predatory laws aimed at shutting down clinics that provide reproductive health care services and highlights how far some states will go to restrict a woman’s right to choose. We must remain vigilant against such measures going forward.”
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Amy Shoremount-Obra
MUSICIANS COMING TO PAHALA in August will present a concert to support KAHU Radio and honor Ka`u Coffee growers.
      The concert, a tribute to the 20th anniversary of the post-plantation Ka`u Coffee industry, will, in part, raise funds for Hawai`i Public Radio and its efforts to bring a stronger and more reliable signal to all of Ka`u and the entire state. HPR operates KAHU radio and work is in progress on a tower toward expanding the broadcast to the entire community. The coverage is also considered critical for Civil Defense, as much of Ka`u is without any emergency radio reception.
      Opera singer Amy Shoremount-Obra returns to Pahala Plantation House on Saturday, Aug. 13 at 6 p.m. The concert features the soprano, internationally acclaimed violinist Eric Silberger, cellist Daniel Lelchuk and pianist Kwan Yi. It is one in a series in the inaugural year of the Hawai`i International Music Festival, with other performances at Maui Arts & Cultural Center and on O`ahu.
      Shoremount-Obra’s family includes the founders of Rusty’s Hawaiian 100% Island Coffee, including the late Rusty Obra as well as Lorie and Joan Obra, Ralph Gaston and Shoremont-Obra’s husband Rusty Obra. She brought operatic music to Pahala in 2009 as a community outreach program with a grant she received from the Sing for Hope organization in conjunction with her alma mater The Juilliard School. She was accompanied by a pianist and tenor. The trio performed operatic music for Ka`u Coffee growers and other community members at Pahala Plantation House.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
      For more, see himusicfestival.com.

Maiki Cofer and John Poetzel received brown belt certification
last Friday. Photo from Cliff Field
PAHALA DOJO MEMBERS Maiki Cofer and John Poetzel successfully completed their promotion test to the rank of brown belt in the International Karate League on June 24. The promotion brings them one step closer to attaining their black belts. 
      Cofer organized and has been teaching a keiki karate conditioning class for ages five to 10 held every Tuesday and Friday at 5 p.m. before the regular beginners class. The class helps youngsters prepare for the beginners class.
      Pahala Dojo, established in 2009, holds classes every Tuesday and Friday at Pahala Community Center. A beginners class from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. is taught by Sensei Susan Field. An advance class follows from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., taught by Sensei Cliff Field. Classes are open to anyone interested in learning a traditional martial art, and the public is welcome to watch classes.
      Pahala Dojo is a member of the International Karate League. Recently, IKL obtained a 501c3 status and now has 31 dojos across the country.
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Mosquitoes in Hawai`i Project works to identify what species
live where.
KA`U RESIDENTS CAN HELP the Mosquitoes in Hawai`i Project identify where mosquito species live. The citizen science project, established in May 2015, is powered by iNaturalist, the primary social network for natural history. The iNaturalist app allows individuals to take photos of any living thing and upload them to the cloud to be identified by thousands of volunteers worldwide.
      To get involved, download the iNaturalist app. Go to iNaturalist and set up an account. Capture a mosquito, or rear from larvae wrigglers, in a closed container. Place adult insects in the freezer for 20 minutes to make sure they have expired. Place them on a sheet of paper, and take several pictures, especially on the back. Open the app and import the best photos. Double-check that dates, times and locations are correct. Upload the record.
      Project organizers urge participants to be cautious when around mosquitoes and wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks, shoes or boots and repellent.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
      See http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mosquitoes-in-hawaii.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION encourages residents to meet with county officials who will discuss the planned Ocean View Transfer Station tomorrow at 6 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center.
      Call 939-7033 for more information.

LEARN ABOUT THE EVOLUTION of landscape restoration at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park at After Dark in the Park tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.