About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Lava is advancing down the pali near the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision in Puna.
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory map from NASA Earth Observing-1
satellite's Advanced Land Imager
GOV. DAVID IGE ANNOUNCED his support of a bill pertaining to water rights for farmers and ranchers. House Bill 2501 involves state licenses for Ka`u farmers and ranchers, who were afraid of losing them, as well as a state water license on Alexander & Baldwin’s former Maui sugar lands where the court has ordered the return of water to natural streams.
      “We have a water permit process that has not been working,” Ige said. “While I have major reservations about HB2501, it does provide time to transition to a process that ensures water is distributed fairly in accordance with the public trust doctrine and that decisions are made in a timely manner. The issues this bill addresses affect A&B and others such as Kaua`i Island Utility Cooperative and Hawaiian Electric Co. and smaller farmers who have revocable water permits and are not able to convert them to leases in the time allowed under statute.
      “I understand why taro farmers on Maui would want this bill vetoed, and to them I say that water diversions will not continue as they have in the past. The State Water Code explicitly prohibits wasting water, and I expect A&B to stop diverting any water it is not actively using. I also expect A&B to make its plans to support sustainable, diversified agriculture available to the public as quickly as possible and to act in good faith, so we can all pitch in on shaping Maui’s future.
Water will continue to run for farmers and ranchers awaiting
state licenses to replace one-month revocable permits.
Photo from Hawai`i Department of Agriculture
      “My expectation is that the Board of Land and Natural Resources and the Commission on Water Resource Management will act quickly, especially in setting instream flow standards so we all have the same facts. As the Board and Commission consider any application for long-term leases, I also expect them to factor in expected climate change impacts to rainfall, in-stream protection, and forest protection.
      “My administration is committed to helping the parties involved in East Maui to mediate their differences to avoid costly delays for everyone. Let us move forward together.”
      The bill will require that where an application has been made to continue an old lease, a holdover may be authorized annually until the pending application for the disposition of water rights is finally resolved or for three years, whichever is sooner. It will also require that the holdover is consistent with the public trust doctrine and any applicable law.
      Regarding amendments that placed a maximum of three years for applicants’ leases to be approved, Ways & Means Committee chair Sen. Jill Tokuda said, “We wanted to refocus the discussion on the farmers, ranchers and cattlemen statewide who were impacted by the broad ruling of the court. Our committee agreed to these amendments understanding that there are water permit holders throughout the state, including Wood Valley Water & Farm Coop, Kualoa Ranch, Kapapala Ranch, the Kaua`i Island Utilities Cooperative, Kapua Orchards Estate, LLC, Molowa`a Farmers Cooperative and the East Kauai Water Users Co-op, to name a few.”
      Ka`u’s Sen. Russell Ruderman voted for the measure but with reservations, while Sen. Josh Green voted against it.
      “Gov. Ige failed to achieve the right balance in this situation,” said Marti Townsend, Director for the Sierra Club of Hawai`i. “His decision unnecessarily favors profit-driven water diversions above the best interests of the public. Our laws are written to ensure that our water is held in trust for everyone’s benefit. The Ige Administration should follow those laws, not change them to benefit those that divert public water for private gain, while harming the people and our environment.”
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A geologist collects fresh lava samples for chemical analysis.
Photo from USGS/HVO
THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW southeast of Pu`u `O`o continues to advance and spread on its way toward the Puna Coast near Kalapana, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported this morning. A satellite image from yesterday showed that the flow was 3.9 miles long, and the flow front was progressing down the pali along the western boundary of the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. The advance rate over the past four days has increased to about 0.2 miles per day, likely due to the steeper slope on the pali.
      At Kilauea's summit, the lava lake continues to rise. HVO reported it being 80 feet below the adjacent crater floor this morning.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

CONSERVATION COUNCIL FOR HAWAI`I asks for help in reaching a goal of raising $18,000 to produce and distribute this year’s wildlife education poster to 450 public, charter, Hawaiian language immersion and private schools in Hawai`i.
Conservation Council for Hawai`i's poster
features art by Caren Lobel-Fried.
      Posters will also be distributed to community leaders and organizations, wildlife agencies, elected officials, attendees of the IUCN World Conservation Congress in September and anyone who requests them.
      This year’s poster features native Hawaiian birds with a focus on forest birds and the extinct `o`o bird as an example of species extinction in the islands.
      “When we talk with children at community events, we notice our keiki know more about the extinction of dinosaurs than they do about the loss of unique Hawaiian birds,” coordinator Marjorie Ziegler said. “This prompted us to collaborate with award-winning author, artist, and conservationist Caren Loebel-Fried on a book and poster project about Hawaiian birds and the `o`o.
      “Caren’s amazing block print for this year’s poster portrays a local boy communicating with an `o`o bird in a modern-day dream scene.”
      Poster text is written by Dr. Sheila Conant, a leading authority on Hawaiian birds and a dedicated conservationist. The text on the back of the poster includes information on the status of Hawai`i’s birds, their cultural significance, what can be done to help protect them, and the `o`o bird’s special story.
      Suggested donations are $50-$200 for individuals; $200-1,000 for small organizations and businesses; $1,000-$5,000 for medium organizations, businesses and agencies; and $5,000 or more for large organizations. Any amounts are accepted.
      Mail checks made out to the Conservation Council for Hawai`i to PO Box 2923 Honolulu HI 96802, or 808-593-0255 to make a credit card donation.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Mayor Billy Kenoi comes to Ka`u tomorrow
to open two new playgrounds.
OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION encourages residents to meet with county officials who will discuss the planned Ocean View Transfer Station today at 6 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center.
      Call 939-7033 for more information.

GRAND OPENING OF TWO NEW Ka`u playgrounds is set for tomorrow. Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County Council member Maile David invite residents to Na`alehu Park at 10:30 a.m. and Pahala Community Center at 12:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

HAWAI`I POLICE DEPARTMENT will make an “active shooter” presentation in Na`alehu Community Center on Wednesday, July 6 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. It is designed to help individuals increase their survivability should they encounter an active shooter or other type of active violent incident.
      Police will provide information on previous incidents of mass violence, recent events, best practices for those caught in such situations, law enforcement’s response and how to work together as a community toward prevention. They will also provide additional resources for participants so they can continue their education on this topic, followed by a question-and-answer segment.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/Kau_Calendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.