About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Tuesday, April 5, 2016

A photo from Pa`a Pono Miloli`i identifies keiki crew of the Malolo, which returns to Miloli`i this month after restoration work.
See more below.
IN A STEP THAT MAY BE a precursor of the future of `alala at Keauhou Bird Conservation Center in Volcano, captive-reared puaiohi flew into the forests of Kaua`i today, marking the end of a successful breeding program for the species and beginning the next step in its recovery. Conservation biologists from the Kaua`i Forest Bird Recovery Project, Hawai`i’s Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service-Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office and San Diego Zoo Global’s Hawaiian Endangered Bird Conservation Program worked together to bring the group of birds to the forest for release, similar to efforts at KBCC.
A program on Kaua`i similar to one at Keauhou Bird Conservation
Center in Volcano has successfully returned a native bird species
to the forests there. Photo from DLNR-DOFAW
      “This is a bittersweet moment for those of us who have been working with these birds on a daily basis,” said Bryce Masuda, Conservation Program Manager, San Diego Zoo Global. “We will miss seeing them every day but are delighted to be part of the collaborative effort to ensure this species survives into the future.”
      “The puaiohi is an example of how the strong partnerships in Hawai`i’s conservation community and lots of hard work can change the outlook for a species.” said Megan Laut, Vertebrate Recovery Coordinator, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office.
      KBCC plans to release the first of its captive-reared `alala into the forest later this year.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

ST. JUDE’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH in Ocean View was burglarized on Friday, the night after Ocean View Community Center was burglarized, reported Max Dible, of West Hawai`i Today. Ka`u Police Chief Burt Shimabukuro told Dible the church showed evidence of forced entry at the church, as did the community center.
Burt Shimabukuro
      He said the burglaries may be connected, but that there was no definitive evidence so far.
      The police report did not list the items stolen or specify whether the church had been vandalized. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 939-2520.
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

GOV. DAVID IGE PROPOSED a funding plan that he said is consistent with the state Constitution requirement to provide sufficient funding for administrative and operating expenses for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands.
      For Fiscal Year 2016, the state proposes replacing DHHL’s $9.63 million general fund appropriation for administration and operating expenses with $17.14 million in general funds. For FY17, the state proposes $17.8 million in general funds with fringe benefits of $5.7 million, for a total of $23.5 million for the department.
      If approved by the state Legislature, the funding would be the highest level ever for DHHL.
      “We want to give DHHL the tools and flexibility to reform and restructure the department. I will hold DHHL accountable, with the ultimate goal of giving beneficiaries greater access to DHHL programs and services,” Ige said.
Jobie Masagatani
      DHHL’s funding has been varied over the years. From 2010-2013, the department received no general funds and used trust and special funds to operate.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

DEPARTMENT OF HAWAIIAN HOME LANDS remains focused on closing its funding gap in light of Gov. David Ige’s $17.1 million proposal for fiscal year 2016.
      “This is definitely a positive step in the right direction, and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands will capitalize on this momentum as we continue to work with the Legislature to close the gap before the end of this legislative session,” said Jobie Masagatani, Hawaiian Homes Commission Chairman and Director of the DHHL.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Joe Tateyama and his wife at a Ka`u High reunion
in Las Vegas. Photo from Neal Kanda
MORE THAN 70 ALUMNI and friends of Ka`u High School have signed up so far to attend the annual school reunion, this year at the California Hotel in Las Vegas on June 24. Organizer Neal Kanda encourages everyone from Ka`u High to join in. “This is very exciting as we approach our June get-together,” Kanda said.
      For more information, he can be reached at nkkanda2@gmail.com or 808-284-1066.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK has announced flight plans for this month. Management of the park requires use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources and to maintain backcountry facilities.
      Flights on April 8, 18, 21, 25 and 28 between 6 a.m. and noon shuttle crew, camp supplies, fencing material and equipment to Mauna Loa at about 9,000-ft. elevation.
      On April 8 between 7 a.m. and 12 p.m., flights shuttle crew and camp supplies between Daniel K. Inouye Hwy (Saddle Road) and the northwest area of Kahuku for vegetation monitoring.
      Flights shuttle crew to and from the western area of Kahuku around 7,500-foot elevation for vegetation monitoring on April 18 between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.
      Ungulate surveys and control work in Kahuku between 3,000- and 7,000-foot elevation take place on April 19 between 6 a.m. and 9 a.m.
      In addition, USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kilauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Apprentice canoe builders learn from kupuna during restoration
of the Malolo. Photo from Pa`a Pono Miloli`i
MALOLO RETURNS TO MILOLI`I on Saturday, April 23. Pa`a Pono Miloli`i invites Ka`u residents to Miloli`i Fishing Village for the arrival and return home of the koa racing canoe. 
      The Malolo Project has been a three-year restoration project under the direction of Bill Rosehill, who is training the next generation of apprentice canoe builders in South Kona.
      Originally built in the 1920s, the Malolo is one of the oldest and most storied koa racing canoes in the state’s history. The Malolo won and set the record at the 1954 Moloka`i Channel race and has been paddled by the legendary Duke Kahanamoku. 
      The event begins at 10 a.m. with traditional Hawaiian protocol and a blessing ceremony. Lunch follows with fellowship as residents welcome home not only the Malolo but her sister canoe the Nai`a, both fully restored to full racing and competition condition just in time for the 2016 regatta season.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Hawaiian hoary bat Image from VAC
WILDLIFE ECOLOGIST FRANK J. Bonaccorso, Ph.D., of USGS Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, shares information on the Hawaiian hoary bat or `ope`ape`a tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Volcano Art Center’s Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village. This endangered species of hairy-tailed bat is endemic to the Hawaiian Islands.
      See volcanoartcenter.org

RANGERS TEACH `UKULELE BASICS tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. The modern Hawaiian musical instrument evolved from the Machete de Braga, a small stringed instrument introduced to Hawai`i by Portuguese immigrants in the late 1800s. The `ukulele has become an iconic part of Hawaiian musical culture and remains popular among locals and foreigners alike.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

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See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html.
See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April_2016.pdf.