About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, July 28, 2016

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists captured dramatic images of lava as it approached the ocean
at Kalapana. See more below. Photo from USGS/HVO
A NEW MARINE RESERVE OPENS on Hawai`i Island’s west coast tomorrow. Gov. David Ige signed the new rule establishing it last week.
      Boundaries encompass the existing Ka`upulehu Fish Replenishment Area, which includes Miloli`i. The rule establishes a 10-year near shore no take “rest period” – with limited exceptions – to allow for recovery of reef fish stocks prior to implementation of a fishery management plan for Ka`upulehu.
Ka`upuleh FRA includes Miloli`i.
Map from DLNR
      “The establishment of this reserve is largely due to the steadfast commitment and efforts of many community members, including longtime fishermen and native Hawaiians who live and fish in this area,” said Suzanne Case, chair of Hawa`i Department of Land and Natural Resources. “They worked for more than 17 years to get support for the Ka`upulehu Reserve. As a result of the rest period, we can expect to see more uhu and other reef fish critical to the health of the coral ecosystem at Ka`upulehu and surrounding areas.”
      “Marine reserves and ‘rest’ areas have proven to be effective in many other areas of Hawai`i and around the world,” said Bruce Anderson, administrator of the Division of Aquatic Resources. “Coral reef ecosystems can recover in just five to 10 years under the right conditions, and the Ka`upulehu area was a very productive fishery historically. We will monitor the abundance of fish and coral cover annually, and develop a responsible management plan that should allow for at least some types of fishing to resume once the rest area is re-opened.”
      The rule prohibits the take or possession of any aquatic life within the reserve boundaries, from the shoreline seaward to the 20-fathom (120-foot) depth contour. Beyond the 20-fathom depth contour, hook-and-line fishing is allowed for the following bottom fish, pelagic and introduced species: `opakapaka, kalekale, lehi, gindai, onaga, ehu, hapu`upu`u, uku, nabeta, aku, ahi and tombo, a`u, ono, mahimahi, ta`ape, toau, and roi. Also, Kona crab may be taken by Kona crab net.
      The rule also prohibits possession or use of any fishing gear other than hook-and-line and/or Kona crab net within the reserve; and deploying any fishing gear shoreward of the 20-fathom depth contour.
      In 1998, the state Legislature designated the West Hawai`i Regional Fishery Management Area to address declining aquatic resources resulting from improved shoreline access along the Kona coast. The law required DLNR to identify and designate areas within the FMA as fish reserves where no fishing of reef-dwelling fish is allowed.
      DLNR held a combined public information meeting and formal public rulemaking hearing on Feb. 11, 2016 in West Hawai‘i to amend Hawai`i Administrative Rules Title 13, chapter 60.4 to establish Ka`upulehu Marine Reserve. The rules were approved by the Board of Land and Natural Resources on May 27, 2016.
      The updated regulation will be posted tomorrow at hawaii.gov/dar/fishing/fishing-regulations/regulated-areas/regulated-fishing-areas-on-hawaii
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Lava continues to flow into the ocean and widen its field
at Kalapana. Map from USGS/HVO
HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY reported that the lava flows field at Kalapana is at least 66 feet wide where it spills over the cliff and enters the ocean. Another narrow lobe of the flow has advanced along the west margin of the main flow. Areas of incandescence remain visible in overnight webcam views of the active lava flow field, marking lava tube skylights and areas of active lava on the pali and along the flow as it extends towards the coast.
      At Kilauea's summit, the depth of the lake was estimated at 77 feet below the crater rim this morning. A webcam from HVO's observation tower showed spattering in the lake.
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov for updates, photos, video footage and more.
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HAWAI`I COUNTY COUNCIL member Maile David and supporters waved signs in Ka`u yesterday. David is running for re-election in the primary on Saturday, Aug. 13.
Supporters joined County Council member Maile David to wave
signs in Pahala yesterday. Photo by Ron Johnson
      “Mahalo a nui loa for the privilege of serving as your council member,” David’s campaign literature states. “Some of the issues facing District VI have been ongoing, and other newly created. Addressing these issues were at times challenging, but very rewarding when solutions were realized. These accomplishments would not have been possible without the support and trust of the people and the working relationships I was privileged to nurture with county departments, state agencies, our mayor and his staff. I look forward to continuing my work and humbly as for your support.”
      David lists accomplishments, including resolutions to acquire Kahua Olohu makahiki grounds, develop a second well in Ocean View, improve Kahuku Park, coordinate a new site for Ocean View transfer station, build and upgrade playgrounds in Na`alehu and Pahala, complete Volcano transfer station and keep Ocean View’s water spigots open during well repair.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Bernie Sanders delegates, including some from Hawai`i, walked out
of the Democratic National Convention after the roll call vote that
nominated Hillary Clinton. Image from Sanders Campaign
OCEAN VIEW RESIDENT Raina Whiting participated in a walkout at the Democratic National Convention, Tom Callis reported in Hawai`i Tribune-Herald. Several Bernie Sanders supporters took the action following Tuesday’s roll call vote that nominated Hillary Clinton as the party’s candidate for President of the United States. Clinton became the nominee when delegates cast more than 2,382 votes for her.
      “For myself, what it was about was drawing light, and getting our voices heard, to the way we’ve been treated thus far,” Whiting told Callis.
      Whiting told Callis that she and other Sanders supporters were frustrated that Clinton was considered as the nominee before delegates cast their votes. She estimated that 15 of Hawai`i’s delegates joined the walkout that Callis said included dozens from other states.
      “We did eventually get to give our vote to Bernie Whiting,” said. “The moment we walked in, Hillary Clinton was already being referred to as the nominee.”
      Whiting rebuked a fellow Sanders delegate from Hawai`i, Chelsea Kent, of O`ahu, for making an obscene gesture as the state’s delegation announced its vote count.
      “I feel very disappointed in her actions,” Whiting told Callis. “It is certainly not a reflection of other individuals in our delegation.”
      Whiting told Callis she wasn’t sure if she would vote for Clinton or not. “At this point, I’ll see how it plays out,” she said. “I’m not saying no, and I’m not saying yes.”
      Ben Wolfgang and Valerie Richardson, of The Washington Times, reported that Whiting “was disgusted by what she described as the unfair playing field.”
      “This is a response to our voices not being heard,” the paper reported her saying. “If Hillary had received the nomination fair and square, that would be one thing. But that’s not what happened.”
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com and washingtonpost.com.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

George Szigeti Photo from HTA
HAWAI`I’S TOURISM INDUSTRY achieved record totals for the first two quarters of 2016, attracting more visitors at 4.4 million and generating more spending at $7.7 billion, than any previous year, Hawai`i Tourism Authority reported. The results also produced a record $820.7 million in state tax revenue for the first two quarters, strengthening the state’s ability to provide programs and services benefiting residents statewide.
      “We are especially heartened by these results through the first half of the year, as our two largest tourism markets, U.S. West and U.S. East, carried the bulk of Hawai`i’s success, bolstered by the new international markets that HTA has been working hard to develop,” HTA President and CEO George Szigeti said. “Hawai`i also had strong results for the month of June, infusing us with confidence that the peak summer travel season will prove to be very fruitful.
      “Hawai`i continues to do well as a global travel destination, and it’s primarily due to the world’s admiration for our beloved Hawaiian culture and the aloha spirit embracing all who come to these islands. Mahalo to all of our industry stakeholders for doing their part every day to make the Hawaiian Islands such a sensational travel experience.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT offers an opportunity to cut invasive Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Participants meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK archaeologist Summer Roper leads a two-mile roundtrip hike to remnants of pa`akai gathering sites along the coast Saturday from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Learn how the residents of this area used a unique method to extract salt, a crucial resource to sustaining life, on this dense lava landscape. Sturdy footwear, water, light rain gear, sun protection and snacks are recommended. The hike is moderately easy; expect hot and dry summer conditions.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

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See kaucalendar.com/news/news.html.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.