About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, May 9, 2017

The state Office of Early Learning is hoping for more enrollment of Pre-Kindergarten next
semester at Na`alehu School. Enrollment is now open for both Pahala and Na`alehu. See
story below. Photo from Executive Office on Early Learning
PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP'S FIRING OF FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION DIRECTOR James Comey on Tuesday drew quick comments from Hawai`i Senators Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz. Hirono called for a special prosecutor and independent investigation into Russian ties to the Trump Presidential campaign, which the FBI under Comey has allegedly been investigating. 
     Stated Hirono, “The President’s decision to fire FBI Director James Comey in this manner, under this pretext, and at this time is a total disservice to the American people. The country is asking, Mr. President, what do you have to hide?"
Sen. Mazie Hirono earlier questioned Comey about his treatment of
candidate Hillary Clinton's handling of emails, then today questioned
Comey's sudden firing by Pres. Donald Trump. C-SPAN image
   Hirono contended that “There is no question that President Trump wants the investigation of Russian interference with the 2016 Presidential election, and the Trump team’s ties to those efforts, to just go away. Knowing this, it is hard to interpret the decision to fire Director Comey as being motivated by anything other than a desire to shut down or derail the FBI’s investigation. In fact, it only raises further suspicions about the Trump team’s ties to Russian interference in our election. For months, I have called for a special prosecutor and an independent investigation into this serious matter. We need a special prosecutor who will conduct an impartial, thorough investigation untainted by political considerations.”
      Schatz declared on Twitter, "We are in a full-fledged constitutional crisis." He said, "Lots of justified confusion and outrage. We need to be prepared to come back together, regardless of party,and take our democracy back." He called the firing, "Scary and unprecedented. At some point we are going to need patriotic Republicans to stand up for our republic." Schatz said that the "arguments against establishing a Special Prosecutor were weak in the first place. They have now evaporated."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

COFFEE WITH A COP is 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. on Wednesday, May 10 at the Ace Hardware parking lot in Na`alehu. Meet local police officers in a casual, no-agenda atmosphere and talk story as part of National Coffee With a Cop Day.

PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE KA`U COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN is Wednesday, May 10 at 5:30 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center. The hearing is before the Windward Planning Commission. Discovery Harbour residents are expected to bring up various zoning issues regarding commercial and resort development, as well as development of convenience stores and other residential amenities. Once approved, the plan goes to the County Council and the Mayor for
approval. After approval and advisory committee will be selected to help guide the plan forward.

Maria Emilia Garcia Schenkeir 
had everyone tapping toes, 
clapping hands and joining in 
as she sang popular Spanish songs
while energetically dancing. 
Photo by Ann Bosted

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

THE SAINT JUDE'S FREE HOT SHOWER PROGRAM to provide free weekly showers for Ocean View residents without access to hot water received a big splash of support from Cinco de Mayo last Friday. 
     About 55 people attended the Cinco de Mayo fund-raising dinner at St. Jude's Church in Ocean View.
     The Free Hot Shower program began in September, 2013. A free hot meal was unintentionally added when a member of the congregation brought left over food to share with the residents who came to shower. It became a popular tradition and now each week hot food, usually soup and bread, is provided with the shower.
The Cinco de Mayo event was very festive. Guests sat at tables that were covered in green, white and red, while the walls were decorated with sombreros. Many of the guests came in costume, and Maria Emilia Garcia Schenkeir entertained diners with her Spanish singing and dancing, while many clapped. The Mexican-style food was cooked and served by volunteers in the congregation.
Pastor Constance Garrett (R) enjoyed the Cinco de Mayo feast 
with Sandy Shelton (L), who has a flower business and 
normally decorates for weddings. She decorated the walls 
and tables to give the dinner a festive air. Photo by Ann Bosted   








To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

RAT LUNGWORM DISEASE IS THE LEAD STORY in this month's state Department of Health Publication O Lokahi, Creating a Healthy Hawai`i Together. Entitled What You Should Know About Rat Lung Disease, the article points to the disease being "a high-profile story reported by the local, national and international news media." Ka`u's County Council member Maile David recommended today that her constituents read up on the disease. 
     The DOH story says that the most common symptoms of rat lungworm disease include severe headache and neck stiffness, but symptoms may vary widely among individuals. Those experiencing headache, fever, stiff neck, tingling or painful feelings in the skin or extremities should seek immediate medical attention, DOH cautions.
Slugs in Ka`u gardens, lawns and on this Pahala pavement
 can carry Rat Lungworm Disease. Photo by Julia Neal
     DOH reports confirmation of 14 cases of Rat Lund Disease in Hawai`i so far this year and reminds the public:  RLW, or Angiostrongyliasis, is a rare disease that affects the brain and spinal cord. It is caused by a parasitic worm found in rats, slugs and snails. Unlike many other diseases, Angiostrongyliasis cannot be spread from person-to-person. People can get infected by eating raw or undercooked snails or slugs that are infected with the parasite. People have also become infected by eating unwashed raw produce such as leafy greens that contain a tiny snail or slug or parts of one.
     There is no medication or specific treatment for the disease but most recover fully without treatment.
     DOH notes that Hawai`i remains a very safe travel destination. Of the 8.7 million visitors  in 2015, there was one case of RLW reported in a visitor, one  visitor case in 2016 and two visitor cases in 2017.
   To prevent Rat Lungworm Disease: Make sure to properly store, inspect and wash produce, especially leafy greens. Supervise young children playing outdoors to prevent them from putting a snail or slug in their mouths. Take precautions to control slug, snails and rats around homes and workplaces, especially home gardens. Farmers, as well as food handlers and processors, should control slugs, snails, and rats on the farm. Those handling snails or slugs should wear gloves and wash hands.
    The DOH stresses that locally-grown produce is safe to eat. "Just remember to wash all vegetables and fruits thoroughly no matter where they come from," says the article.
     Food safety inspectors regularly distribute information to the food food industry, including at farmers’ markets where flyers are passed out to vendors and shoppers. DOH’s Food Safety Program continues to inspect and educate food establishments across the state for safe food handling and preparation. Food establishments are reminded to use only approved and licensed sources and carefully inspect and wash all produce during food preparation.
     More information on the signs and symptoms of rat lungworm infection are on the DOH website at: www.health.hawaii.gov. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

PREKINDERGARTEN, which started in Ka`u public schools three years ago, will be offered again next school year at Pahala and Na`alehu Elementary Schools. Corine Suwa Kalani, Early Learning Resource Teacher in the Executive Office on Early Learning, quoted Bill Gates, Co-Chair of the Gates Foundation on the reason for pre-kindergaren.
          Gates said, "The first five years have so much to do with how the next 80 years turn out."
"The first five years have so much to do with how the next 80 years turn out,"
said Bill Gates, whose foundation supports Early Learning initiatives.
Photo from the state Executive Office on Early Learning
     Organizers are hoping for more enrollment at Na`alehu School. The state Department of Education has opened the enrollment and families can download the application for both Pahala and Na`alehu from www.earlylearning.hawaii.gov or www.hawaiipublicschools.org or pick them up and return them to the school.
     Children must be age four on or before July 31 of the current school year. For school year 2017-2018, children born Aug. 1, 2012- July 31, 2013 are eligible. The program is open to families earning 250 percent or less of the Federal Poverty Level. Families of two can earn up to $46,675, families of three up to $58,700. Families of four can earn up to $70,275, families of five up to $82,750, families of six up to $94,776, families of seven up to $106,800 and families of eight up to $118,825 per year.
    Enrollment for each class is limited to 20 students.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

Lā‘au Lapa‘au. Wed., May 10 at 10 a.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Delve into the world of lā‘au lapa‘au, Hawaiian herbal medicine, with local practitioner Momi Subiono. She uses herbs to help the Hawaiian community and aims to create awareness, understanding, and use of plants for traditional healing. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eauExperience the Skillful Work workshops. Free.


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter