About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Wednesday, May 30, 2018

How to manage intermittent ash and S02 in the air at the schools and in homes and outdoors, was
the hot topic at this evening's meeting in Pāhala on the continuing emissions from Kīlaeua Volcano.
Photo by Julia Neal
LIVING WITH EXPOSURE TO ASH falling in Kaʻū and more S02 in the air coming from Kīlauea Volcano drew a packed house at the Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose room this evening.
     Families, teachers, and community volunteers told their stories. A grandmother asked why schools stayed open when there was ash everywhere. A Pāhala kindergarten teacher said she thought that her classroom, closed up with an air cleaner, provides at least as good or a better air quality than some of the children's homes. A teacher from Nāʻālehu School said the ash makes it into his classrooms. He described the windows as having grates instead of screens, and louvers that fail to seal off the room.
Grates instead of screens at Pāhala and Nāʻālehu public
schools. The louvers let in ash, said a teacher. Residents
discussed airconditioning and tight windows for
the classrooms. 
     After the meeting, people talked about the need to have tight windows and air conditioning in Kaʻū's public school classrooms.
     Representatives of the state Department of Health talked about the best way to avoid ash and S02. "Minimize exposure is the best medicine," said Dr. Alvin Bronstein. Stay out of it by going indoors and closing windows until it passes, officials recommended. John Peard, of the health department's Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office, discussed air purifiers, recommending those with HEPA, particulate, and acid gas filters. Make sure that the purifier is the size that fits the size of the room, officials recommended. He also said that during periods of ashfall and S02, outdoor activities can be managed by paying attention to trends. The poor air seems to be concentrated at night and morning, with the clean air in the afternoons.
     Dr. Elizabeth Tam, a pulmonologist, emphasized that ash is irritating to nasal passages and eyes but is not poisonous, and pointed to her long term study that showed that people living in wet places like Hilo had more respiratory problems than drier Kaʻū, with its higher S02.
Kaʻū residents filled the meeting in Pāhala tonight to learn more about air quality alerts and
protecting themselves from ash and S02 from Kīlauea Volcano. Photo by Julia Neal
     County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said that, while the county has a lot to do in Puna where lava is flowing, it does recognize the "increasing S02 and ash hazard out here." He talked about lessons learned in 2008. When the volcano would send out a high level of S02, a community like the one around the golf course near Volcano Village would receive an alert; people would evacuate only to learn that the S02 was gone 20 minutes later. Shelter in place, he repeated.
     Plans were discussed to place more S02 and particulate monitors in such places as Nāʻālehu School and Kaʻū Learning Academy. Nāʻālehu residents asked that Nāʻālehu be added to the air quality reporting online that already delivers information on Volcano, Pāhala, and Ocean View.
     Residents talked about much needed help for Ocean View people, particularly those who have water catchment systems, unprotected by covers and tainted by ash. Those people need bottled water, not only to drink but for bathing, said several speakers. A Pacific Quest representative said that donations of bottled water for Ocean View will be accepted at their offices next to Bay Clinic in Nāʻālehu. Clarissa Pua, of Pāhala, said that she and her husband and pastor Troy Gacuyan have been taking water to Ocean View families.
Ash masks and educational materials and displays arrived at the
Kaʻū meeting on living with ash and S02. Photo by Julia Neal
     State health and Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory representatives talked about improving reporting, to include quicker notifications of ashfalls and the complexity of determining which ashfalls will come this way after explosive eruptions at Halemaʻumaʻu at the Kīlauea summit. HVO director Tina Neal said that the radar facility in Kaʻū is very good at seeing the ash coming this way, and is developing a way to communicate its observations with HVO and the public. More monitors are being placed througout the region. However, "There will always be an element of uncertainty," said Neal.
     Educational materials were handed out to the public on how to weather proof houses for ash fall and clean up afterwards. Pamphlets are entitled, Frequently Asked Questions on Vog from Kīlaeua Volcano; What can I do to protect myself from vog? and The Health Hazards of Volcanic Ash, A Guide for the public. See more from the meeting and these references
at www.kaunewsbriefs.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A 5.3 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE SHOOK VOLCANO TODAY at 10:57 a.m. It was centered at Kīlauea Summit. Wendy Stovall of USGS told press today the summit of Kīlauea continues to experience activity, with many felt earthquakes. Subsidence continues. New radar images show the expansion of Overlook Vent from May 5 to May 29, from a 12-acre area to half of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater.
     At this time, due to the unsafe nature of the area, no scientists have gone close enough to determine if the ash explosions from Halemaʻumaʻu have included any more ejecta, such as rocks.
     Stovall also said one event that registered as quake was actually a pressure explosion.

Radar images from May 5, May 17, and May 29 show the extreme expansion of the Overlook vent in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. Images from USGS
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN ESCAPE ROUTE OUT OF LOWER PUNA from Kalapana to Chain of Craters Road is under construction. Jessica Ferracane of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park said the park and state Department of Transportation signed an agreement to create the alternate route. Residents in lower Puna are at risk of being cut off by lava flow that is making its way in several routes to the ocean.
     Today, crews began to clear a 0.7-mile long stretch of Chain of Craters Road. They are removing enough solidified lava from the 61g lava flow in 2016 and 2017 to create an evacuation-only one-lane gravel road. Ferracane said to expect the work to take “about a week or two in case there are any surprises.” She also said crews will be working to keep side effects low for such wildlife species as nene, the native Hawaiian goose, which are in the area.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Lava flow map as of 9:00 a.m. HST, May 30, 2018. Given the dynamic nature of Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone eruption, with changing vent locations, fissures starting and stopping, and varying rates of lava effusion, map details shown here are accurate as of the date/time noted—and could have changed rapidly since that time. Shaded purple areas indicate lava flows erupted in 1840, 1955, 1960, and 2014-2015. See large map. USGS map
EVACUATIONS OF KAPOHO AND VACTIONLAND in lower Puna are underway. Wendy Stovall of USGS told the press that the Lower East Rift Zone has seen some “pretty significant changes.” A “very rapidly advancing flow” of lava crossed Hwy 132 Tuesday afternoon. Fissure 8 is still producing up to 200 ft lava fountains, with flow nearing Four Corners, “advancing in pauses and surges,” as fast as 600 yards an hour, which is “very fast for this type of flow.” Stovall said the recent progress is “all surprises. This lava is the hottest we’ve seen during this event.”
     This afternoon’s overflight showed lava from Fissure 18 within 0.5 miles of Hwy 137. Stovall said F18 is pushing out a “voluminous amount” of lava. She said there was lava flow 0.6 mi. from Hwy 137 this morning.
     “Depending on where the flow crosses Noni Farms Rd., it could go into Vacationland,” said Stovall. Civil Defense alerted Kapoho and Vactionland to evacuate, with concerns that the alternate Beach Road will be cut off. Kapoho has seen that kind of lava inundation before: in 1960, over the course of a month, Kapoho was destroyed.
     Tom Birchard of NOAA said another factor in the evacuation was concern over power and communications potential to be cut off by the flows.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A DRONE TEAM WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN SAVING A PUNA RESIDENT trapped by lava flow and forest. USGS states: "On Sunday, May 27, the Department of Interior Unmanned Aircraft Systems Kīlauea response team was conducting mapping missions in the lower East Rift Zone to monitor lava flow advancement rates and direction toward Highway 132 and populated areas. Around 7 pm the team launched an aircraft to assess the area in the northeast corner of Leilani Estates and identified a new outbreak of Pāhoehoe lava that was very rapidly moving north down Luana Street into a residential area.
     "The team notified the Emergency Operations Center and field operations of the flow and a need to evacuate the area between Makamae and Nohea Streets to the north of Leilani Avenue. The team began providing live video coverage of the flow's progress to emergency officials in the EOC, who dispatched police and fire units to clear residents off the street. The UAS team continued to provide live coverage of the breakout, and EOC personnel were able to use the information to guide their evacuation actions, including dispatching an emergency alert notification to anyone in the area. 
See video of a drone team aiding in the rescue of a man trapped  by lava on Sunday. USGS video
     "During the preflight of that aircraft, the team overheard radio transmissions that there was a civilian trapped at their residence on Luana Street. The team confirmed the location of the residence and flew into the area to assess if we could be of assistance. The individual was spotted and instructed to 'follow the drone to safety.' The individual began moving through the jungle toward Nohea Street, where the drone was hovering. While he was making his way through the jungle, the UAS team was able to track him visually (he was using a cell phone flashlight) and information about his location was relayed to the ground searchers.
     "After about 10 minutes of providing direction information to both the stranded person and the first responders, the search team was able to make contact and guide him to safety. The UAS team stayed onsite until the crews were clear of the area. The UAS team, field operations, and EOC worked the situation for 2.5 hours. In addition to the SAR mission the UAS team was able track the rate of advancement of the flow along Nohea Street and provide real time information to field operations and live video feed to the EOC regarding the rate and direction of the flow as well as any structures destroyed.
     "Coordination between field ops, the ground searchers, dispatch, the EOC and the DOI UAS team was very effective and we are proud to have been part of this effort. This video shows the UAS being used for aerial reconnaissance to assist in getting messages to emergency responders (seen using flashlights in the video) to rescue the resident." Video by the U.S. Geological Survey and Office of Aviation Services, Department of the Interior, with support from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. Live stream technology provided by NASA Ames.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KONA CRUISE SHIP CANCELS VISIT DUE TO AIR QUALITY. Ross Birch, Executive Director of Hawaiʻi Island Visitors Bureau, said the expected cruise arrival for Kona this week was cancelled due to vog. He said for tourism in general, air quality for the entire island is the largest concern.
     Wind conditions for Wednesday, May 30, were forecast to result in widespread vog over the Island of Hawaiʻi, according to Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory.
     Air Quality Index reporting remains unavailable late today. Colors of the map for 7 p.m. indicate the air in Pāhala is good, with Ocean View and Kona moderate.
     SO2 levels in Pāhala, both locations in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, and Kona have recorded as good since midnight. Ocean View was mostly good, with scattered spikes of moderate levels – at most, 0.20 parts per million – in the early afternoon.
     See AirNow. See Hawaiʻi Short Term SO2 Advisory. Also see the University of Hawaiʻi air quality predictions on its VMAP.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
*Events marked with an asterisk may be affected due to the closure of the main part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and other eruption activity. All Volcano Art Center activities and most exhibits have moved to the Center's Ni‘aulani Campus.

FRIDAY, JUNE 1
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, Jun 1-29 (closed Jun 11), Ka’ū. Nā’ālehu: Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263. Ocean View: Ocean View Community Center, Mon & Tue, 8-1pm. Pāhala: Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue & Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See hceoc.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/2018-LIHEAP-APPLICATION.pdf for eligibility requirements and application.

23rd Annual Kona Classic Jackpot - Classic Fishing Tournament Series, Fri-Sun, Jun 1-3, Honokōhau Club House. All profits go towards marine conservation and youth educational programs in and around Miloli‘i. $300 entry fee, 4 per boat, $25 additional. Cash prizes $100-$3,000. Qualifying weights: Marlin, 100lbs; Ahi, 50lbs; Mahi, 15lbs; Ono, 15lbs. Grand Prize qualifies for Las Vegas Trip. Contact Wilfred Kaupiko, 896-6272, kalanihale@gmail.com. Sponsored by Kalanihale, kalanihale.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 2
23rd Annual Kona Classic Jackpot - Classic Fishing Tournament Series, Sat-Sun, Jun 2-3, Honokōhau Club House. All profits go towards marine conservation and youth educational programs in and around Miloli‘i. $300 entry fee, 4 per boat, $25 additional. Cash prizes $100-$3,000. Qualifying weights: Marlin, 100lbs; Ahi, 50lbs; Mahi, 15lbs; Ono, 15lbs. Grand Prize qualifies for Las Vegas Trip. Contact Wilfred Kaupiko, 896-6272, kalanihale@gmail.com. Sponsored by Kalanihale, kalanihale.org

“Libraries Rock” Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, Jun 2 - Jul 14, statewide & online. Register (starting Jun 2) and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, & adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.
yART Sale! Gigantic Rummage Sale, Sat, Jun 2, 8:30-2pm, Volcano Art Center’s Hale Ho‘omana. Benefits VAC programs and workshops. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

*Stewardship at the Summit, Jun 2, 8, 16, 23, & 29, 8:45am, meet Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

Stained Glass Basics II, Sat & Sun, Jun 2, 3, 9 & 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku, Sat, Jun 2, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, two-mile, guided hike on Kahuku Unit's newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku, explores the traditional Hawaiian classification system. Bring snack.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3
23rd Annual Kona Classic Jackpot - Classic Fishing Tournament Series, Sun, Jun 3, Honokōhau Club House. All profits go towards marine conservation and youth educational programs in and around Miloli‘i. $300 entry fee, 4 per boat, $25 additional. Cash prizes $100-$3,000. Qualifying weights: Marlin, 100lbs; Ahi, 50lbs; Mahi, 15lbs; Ono, 15lbs. Grand Prize qualifies for Las Vegas Trip. Contact Wilfred Kaupiko, 896-6272, kalanihale@gmail.com. Sponsored by Kalanihale, kalanihale.org

Stained Glass Basics II, Sat & Sun, Jun 3, 9 & 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222
Palm Trail, Sun, Jun 3, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. nps.gov/HAVO

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun, Jun 3, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointarc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

MONDAY, JUNE 4
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue/Wed, Jun 4 & 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Mon, Jun 4 & 18, 1pm, Ocean View Community Center. A parent-led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Mon, Jun 4, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JUNE 5
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue/Wed, Jun 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Volunteer Clean-Up w/Hawai‘i Outdoor Institute, Tue, Jun 5, contact in advance for meet up time at Wai‘ōhinu Park. Space limited. Free; donations appreciated. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, wildhawaii.org

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 4-6pm, Jun 19, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Wed, Jun 6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

AdvoCATS, Wed, Jun 6, 7-5pm, Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

*Open Mic Night, Wed, Jun 6, 6-10pm, Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Singers, Bands, Comedians, etc. Call 967-8365 after 4pm to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years+. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

NEW & UPCOMING
GROW ME THE MONEY: RECORD-KEEPING PRINCLPLES AND BEST PRACTICES for farmers and food producers, Saturday, June 30, 3 to 6pm, at Kaʻū District Gym.
     Learn practical tips and key steps for organizing and maintaining a record keeping system for your agribusiness, including seed (bean)-to-sale tracking and developing standard operating procedures. Maile Woodhall, agricultural outreach specialist at The Kohla Center, will be the keynote speaker.
     Tuesday, July 17, Kaʻū District Gym will host another Kohala Center workshop: Business Capitalization and Funding Services. Discover loan, grant, and financial incentive programs for your business, and learn best practices for applying for USDA funding from Megan Blazak, agricultural business development specialist at The Kohala Center.
     Free; registration required. Contact Megan Blazak, 887-6411, or koha.la/growmoney

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ONGOING
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, Jun 1-29 (closed Jun 11), Ka’ū. Nā’ālehu: Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263. Ocean View: Ocean View Community Center, Mon & Tue, 8-1pm. Pāhala: Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue & Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See hceoc.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/2018-LIHEAP-APPLICATION.pdf for eligibility requirements and application.

*Exhibit: Fishponds of Hawai‘i by Carol Araki Wyban, online during park closure, through Jun 24. See volcanoartcenter.org for other exhibits and activities available at the Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus.

Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade Registration Open, held June 30. Call Debra McIntosh, 929-9872

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open, online at volcanorainforestruns.com. Fees, before Jul 31: 5K - $30, 10K - $35, 1/2 Marathon - $85. Race Day Sat, Aug 18, with staggered morning start times, from Volcano Village. Race Director Sharron Faff, 967-8240

5th Annual Harvest Festival Fundraiser for The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences at Volcano Winery, Sun, Sept 9. Tickets on sale Aug 1: volcanowinery.com or 967-7772. Live music by The Young Brothers; food & drink from local restaurants; award-winning wine and tea; tours of the vineyards.

5th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration Open, online at webscorer.com/register?raceid=128145. Fees, before Mon, Jul 9: 5K - $25, 10K - $35, and 1/2 Marathon - $45. Race Day Sat, Sept 22, 7am; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill, kaucoffeemill.com. Event organizers: ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou, okaukakou.org

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.