About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Thursday, June 14, 2018

S02, other gasses, and particles are blown from Fissure 8 in lower Puna down the coast, and can contribute to vog in Kaʻū. This morning, June 14, 
a USGS overflight shows Fissure 8 viewed from the north at 7:50 AM. The cone is roughly 50 m (165 ft) high at is peak, and a plume of sulfur 
dioxide and other volcanic gases rises as an orange tinge from the erupting lava fountains (hidden within the cone). Lava is still flowing out 
of the vent unabated as a full channel. To the left of the cone, a standing wave of lava can be seen in the channel. USGS photo





























"THERE IS NOT OLIVINE RAINING FROM THE SKY," said University of Hawai‘i-Hilo volcanologist Cheryl Gansecki during today's daily press briefing on volcanic activity. Gansecki addressed a viral tweet and stories about olivine gems falling from the sky from the volcano in Hawai‘i. She said photos accompanying the stories do not match what scientists are seeing in lower Puna. They more closely match the olivine at Green Sand Beach in Ka‘ū.
     Gansecki made it clear that olivine sampled in lower Puna is tiny and embedded in tephra and not of the size that created Green Sand Beach. Green Sand Beach olivine is much larger and was embedded and separated from Picrite lava, she explained.
Green Sand beach olivine in Ka‘ū is of a different type than the olivine
found in lower Puna during the current eruption. Photo by Peter Anderson
     Gansecki and her U.H. Hilo students and staff are are able to chemically analyze lava samples quickly for USGS. Their findings on olivine chemistry are leading the USGS to think that the lava now in lower Puna is from the recent movement of magma from Halema‘uma‘u and Kīlauea  summit.

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WHERE DOES THE PUBLIC WANT MORE AIR QUALITY MONITORING STATIONS? This is the question asked by the state Department of Health. DOH plans to install ten more permanent monitoring stations to measure fine particles (PM2.5) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) on Hawai‘i Island. Residents can suggest locations by emailing DOH’s Clean Air Branch at cab@doh.hawaii.gov by Wednesday, June 27.
Air monitor stations can cost $120,000. Photo from DOH
    There are five permanent stations on Hawai‘i Island: Hilo, Mountain View, Pāhala, Ocean View, and Kona. A temporary station is at the Nā‘ālehu Fire Station. Among the candidates for the ten new stations are Kona and Kohala.     
     When all of the stations are in place, DOH’s ambient air monitoring network will operate 25 stations statewide, including two National Park Service stations at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     "When fully operational, the additional air quality monitoring stations will provide real-time data from different areas of the island so emergency responders can advise residents and visitors on appropriate actions they can take to protect their health and safety," says a statement from Department of Health.
     “The input we have received from residents during community meetings has been invaluable,” said state health director, Dr. Bruce Anderson. “We want to encourage ongoing dialogue so we can better address their concerns and ensure an effective response.”
     Air quality monitoring stations measure particulates, or pollution, including ash in the air, and gases such as sulfur dioxide. Monitors closer to the Kīlauea East Rift Zone also gauge levels of hydrogen sulfide in the air. Data are used primarily to provide air pollution updates to the public in a timely manner, identify trends, forecast air quality, correlate air quality to health effects, guide emergency management activities, and support air pollution studies.
Overflight this morning of lower Puna, which shows Fissure 8 continuing to 
roar, spreading fumes. See video on Ikaika Marzo’s Facebook.
     Anderson noted that each air quality monitoring station contains sophisticated equipment that yields reliable data for informed decision-making. A fully-loaded station with a shelter can cost as much as $120,000 each. Site modifications that include security and fencing or electrical access can add to this cost. Installing a station typically takes from a few months up to a year to complete, but DOH is speeding up the process to obtain air quality data faster, said Anderson.
     He said that selecting an air quality monitoring station is based on rigorous U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulatory requirements. The following are factors considered in the decision-making process:
     Atmospheric conditions: This includes the effects of buildings, terrain, and heat sources or sinks on air trajectories that can produce anomalies of pollutant concentrations. Meteorology is also considered in determining the geographic location of a site, as well as the height, direction, extension of sampling probes, and prevailing wind conditions.
     Logistics: This includes procurement, site security, set-up and maintenance, and transportation of material and personnel for the monitoring operation.
A series of wide-angle webcam images, captured by a camera in HVO's observation tower
 between June 1 and June 10, shows ongoing subsidence around Halema‘uma‘u at the 
summit of Kīlauea. See the animated GIF
     Security risks: DOH is considering installing air quality monitoring sites at schools, since they offer secure areas to minimize the threats of theft and vandalism. As additional benefits, the schools will have access to data to determine the best actions for students, such as sheltering in place, and whether it is safe to go outdoors for recess. It can also serve as a learning tool for the students. 
    Economics: DOH considers the economics of each air quality monitoring site, including the resources required for site acquisition, site preparation, data collection activities, instrumentation, installation, maintenance, data retrieval, data analysis, quality assurance, and data interpretation.
The latest photos of Halema`uma`u, where the lava lake was enjoyed by onlookers for years,
shows much of the floor of the crater gone, and the deepest part of the crate now 1,000 feet
below the crater rim, as the rim and walls slump inward. USGS photo
     "The community should base their recommendations for air quality monitoring station locations on these factors, and email their suggestions to the DOH’s Clean Air Branch cab@doh.hawaii.gov by Wednesday, June 27," said a DOH statement.

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EVENTS AT THE SUMMIT of Kīlauea over the past few weeks dramatically reshaped Halema‘uma‘u, as show in in aerial photographs taken this week. Only part of Halema‘uma‘u Crater floor remains, having subsided 100 m (about 300 ft) during the past couple weeks. Ground cracks circumferential to the crater rim cut across the parking lot for the former Halema‘uma‘u visitor overlook (closed since 2008). The deepest part of Halema‘uma‘u is now about 300 m (1,000 ft) below the crater rim. The Halema‘uma‘u crater rim and walls continue to slump inward and downward with
ongoing subsidence at Kīlauea's summit.   
A closer view of the cracks cutting across the parking lot for the former Halema‘uma‘u visitor 
overlook, closed since 2008, when an active vent opened within the crater. USGS photo
     At 3:19 a.m. today, another small explosion occurred at Kīlauea's summit, producing a plume which rose to 6,000 ft above sea level. "This event and many of its precursory earthquakes were felt widely in the Volcano area. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit," reported Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
     Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. This gas and minor amounts of ash are being transported downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.
     For forecasts of where ash would fall under forecast wind conditions, consult the Ash3D model output here: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/ash_information.html. Information on volcanic ash hazards and how to prepare for ash fall maybe found at http://www.ivhhn.org/information#ash (health impacts) or https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanic_ash/

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Earthquake crack on Hwy 11. NPS photo
HIGHWAY 11 REPAIRS IN HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK begin next week. Jessica Ferracane, parks spokesperson, said that work to repair damage caused by seismic activity to Highway 11, which runs through the park, will begin on the Hilo side of the Park entrance. She said the road will not be closed, but motorists are advised that flaggers will be directing traffic.

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FEMA ASSISTANCE FOR INDIVIDUALS who have lost their homes or access to their homes due to volcanic activity since May 3, was approved today by the President of the United States. Approval of yesterday's request from Gov. David Ige means that qualifying residents may receive assistance from the federal government’s full scope of individual assistance programs to address issues such as shelter needs, unemployment, trauma, and legal matters, said a statement from the governor.
     Victims can begin applying for help tomorrow, Friday, June 15, at a FEMA Disaster Relief Center at Keaʻau High School. County, state, and federal agencies will initially gather information from residents who have suffered losses.
     Residents whose primary homes were destroyed or whose homes are inaccessible due to the lava flow, should register at the FEMA Disaster Relief Center for possible assistance. The agencies will review each case based on the information provided before making decisions on individual assistance, said a statement from the governor's office. 
The lava wiped out many farms and homes, their owners now eligible to seek individual assistance from FEMA.
USGS photo
    Before he signed the authorization, Hawai‘i’s Congressional Delegation - Sen. Mazia Hirono, Sen. Brian Schatz, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, and Rep. Colleen Hanabusa - wrote to President Donald Trump in support of Hawai`i's application to amend the existing disaster declaration, to include Individual Assistance:
     “As detailed in Governor Ige’s request, Hawaiʻi County estimates that 455 residential dwellings have been destroyed, and has confirmed that 192 of these structures were primary residences. As of June 6, 2018, there have been 5,417 overnight stays in emergency shelters, and more than 400 people remain at two shelters. More than 930 homes are without power in the affected area, and there can be no attempt to restore power to more 800 of these customers until the area is deemed safe.
     “This is a unique and wrenching natural disaster. When a volcano erupts, it permanently and fundamentally changes the land. The land now covered in lava is no longer usable. 
The defining features of the landscape that attract visitors and play an economic role in the community are no longer there. Homes and businesses are destroyed. Properties and farms not destroyed have become inaccessible and unusable. The damage to health and economic opportunity spreads further than the footprint of the lava flows: Winds carry toxic gas and ash into neighboring areas, and the eruption also produces ‘vog’—volcanic smog—harming the health of humans, as well as farms, local plants and animals. Lastly, there has been a 50 percent drop in future hotel bookings, suggesting that tourism to the island may be seriously disrupted.
     “Based on the severity of the damage that has occurred since May 11, 2018, an amendment to your initial Declaration to include eligibility for Individual Assistance is warranted, and we urge your expeditious approval of Governor Ige’s request for this additional aid for impacted individuals,”
wrote Hawai‘i's Congressional delegation.

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Senator Hirono presents Admiral Harris with a lei before his hearing 
to serve as U.S. Ambassador to South Korea. Photo from Mazie Hirono
ADMIRAL HARRY HARRIS WILL SERVE OUR COUNTRY WELL AS AMBASSADOR TO SOUTH KOREA, Sen. Mazie Hirono said today. She introduced the retired Commander of U.S. Pacific Command and the U.S. Pacific Fleet,  during today’s Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on his nomination.
      During her introduction, Hirono emphasized the key role that the U.S. Ambassador to South Korea could play in reaching an agreement to a permanent, verifiable denuclearization of North Korea.
     Hirono said, “I first met Admiral Harris just before he assumed command of the U.S. Pacific Fleet in October 2013. Over the past five years, I’ve gotten to know Admiral Harris and appreciate the open, supportive, and candid relationship that we’ve developed. He and his wife Bruni Bradley have become part of our Hawaiʻi ʻohana.
      “In Admiral Harris, we have someone who is tough-minded and clear-eyed with tremendous military experience and someone who is very resourceful and focused on the task at hand. Admiral Harris’ expertise in the Indo-Pacific region, his leadership experience, and engagement with a variety of stakeholders in the region will stand him in good stead as our Ambassador to South Korea.”
     See video from Senator Hirono’s introduction.

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See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com 
and facebook.com/kaucalendar.

FRIDAY, JUNE 15
‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, Fri, Jun 15, 10-noon, Kahuku Unit. Hawaiian cultural demonstrations. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

Father’s Day Card, Fri, Jun 15, 2-3pmKahuku Park, H.O.V.E. For ages 6-12 years. Register Jun 12-15. Free. Teresa Anderson, 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

4-H Livestock Show & Sale is Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16, at Anderson Arena, also known as Rocking Chair Ranch, at 47-5124 Hawaiʻi Belt Road in Waimea. Open to the public, the annual event supports young farmers and ranchers. This year marks a century of 4-H in Hawai‘i; the state’s first 4-H livestock club opened in 1918.
     Friday’s events begin at 3:30 p.m. and include shows for rabbits, poultry, and goats.
Saturday’s large animal activities kick off with an 8 a.m. welcome, followed by 4-H participants showing lambs, hogs, steers, and heifers. Competition continues for top showmanship honors in the Round Robin Showmanship Class. Buyer’s registration and lunch is at 12:30 p.m., with the sale of 4-H animals at 2 p.m., including beef steer and heifer, hog, lamb, goat, and possibly poultry and rabbits.
     For more information, contact Michelle Galimba at mgalimba@kuahiwiranch.com or 808-430-4927.

SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Nature and Culture: An Unseverable Relationship, Sat, Jun 16, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate guided hike along the Palm Trail, approx. 2 miles. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture, observe catastrophic change and restoration of the land as it transitions from the 1868 lava flow to deeper soils with more diversity and older flora. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

Hands-On Fermented Foods Workshop: 
Sauerkraut and Kombucha w/ Jasmine Silverstein, HeartBeet Foods, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $50/VAC Members, $55/non-Member. Pre-registration required. Supplies and organic ingredients provided. No cooking skills necessary. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Inspired Figure Drawing Workshop, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pmVolcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $60/VAC Member, $65/non-Member, plus $10 model fee. Students asked to bring materials, see volcanoartcenter.org. 967-8222

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Meeting, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pmOcean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting/training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

The Art Express, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.comdiscoveryharbour.net/art-express

Hula Kahiko - Hope Keawe w/Hula Hālau Mana‘olana Sat, Jun 16, 10:30-11:30am, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Hula performance. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula - Kumu Kaho‘okele Crabbe w/Halauokalani, Sat, Jun 16, 11-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Cultural demonstration. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Bunco and Potluck, Sat, Jun 16, 6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring dish to share. Margie Hack, 541-954-8297

SUNDAY, JUNE 17
People and Land of Kahuku, Sun, Jun 17, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free, guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area's human history. nps.gov/HAVO

MONDAY, JUNE 18
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Discovery Harbour Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Mon, Jun 18, 5-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net


TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Tuesday, June 19, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Cooper Center19-4030 Wright Road, Volcano; Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue, Jun 19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed, Jun
e 20, noon-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu, Jun 21, 9-1pmOcean View Community Centerovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Jun 21, 6:30pmUnited Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkley Yoshida, 747-0197

ONGOING
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park invites kamaʻaina and tourist alike to visit the Kahuku Unit. There are no entry fees, and all programs are free of charge. In addition to regularly scheduled Guided Hikes and the monthly Coffee Talk, Kahuku Unit has added daily Ranger Talks, and cultural demonstrations and activities on weekends.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ike Hana Noe ʻAu, Cultural Demonstrations and Activities, at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June, made possible by Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. Make a Ti Leaf Lei, Sat, June 16. Make an Eyelash Lei, Sun, June 17. Make an ͑Ohe Hana Ihu (Nose Flute), Sat, June 23. Make a Mini Feather Kahili, Sun, June 24.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ranger Talks on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
     Guided Hikes begin at 9:30 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June. Meet the ranger at the welcome tent. Sat, June 16: Nature and Culture. Sun, June 17: People and Land. Sat, June 23: Birth of Kahuku. Sun, June 24: ͑Ōhi͑a Lehua.
     Artist in Residence Talk, in the Visitor Center on Fri, June 22, at 10 a.m.
     In the Visitor Contact Station, Coffee Talk, a monthly, casual get together, is held the last Friday of the month. On June 29 at 9:30 a.m., Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund will present Removing Trash, Restoring Habitat.
     Join in the Cultural Festival, Pu ͑uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park, in Hōnaunau, Sat and Sun, June 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     See the Kahuku Unit Rangers,The Kahuku Cowgirls, in the Na ͑alehu 4th of July Parade Sat, June 30, beginning at 10 a.m.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through June 29.
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue (except Mon, June 11), 8-4:30pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through July 14, statewide and online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.
     Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.


5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

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