About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Fast flowing lava river from Fissure 8 continues to feed the ocean entry at Kapoho. USGS photo 
THE NEW LAVA COAST EXENDS 1.3  MILES ALONG THE SHORE in the Kapoho area, according to the latest estimates by the U.S. Geological Survey. The new land added to the island by Madame Pele is about 250 acres, a lava delta that filled in Kapoho Bay and covers nearshore shallow reefs.
     The cinder cone continues to grow in the Leilani Estates area at Fissure 8, with the cone itself 130 feet high in places, with lava fountains reaching 130 to 150 feet, as seen in this morning's USGS overflight.
Jagged Kapoho Coast, with 250 acres of land added to the island, as
shown by this morning's overflight. USGS photo
     Fountaining at Fissure 8 continues to feed the fast-moving channelized flow that is entering the ocean at Kapoho.
     National Weather Service predicts that "slow winds will bring vog inland and to the south, wrapping around to the Kona area this week. The heavy vog conditions are expected to stay this way until the early part of next week." Wherever volcanic and air quality conditions become a problem, the state Department of Health recommends limiting outside activities and staying indoors for those with breathing issues. Monitor the latest air quality measurements through the University of Hawaiʻi’s Vog Measurement and Prediction Project. See SO2 levels. See particulates in the AQI measurements. See the EPA's multi-agency site.

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Workers pave airstrip, in preparation for emergency evacuations from lava-inundated areas. The area may be put to use for transitional housing for
 those displaced by the eruption. See interview with Hawai‘i County Public Works Deputy Director Merrick Nishimoto on Big Island Video News
THE PUNA AIRSTRIP READIED FOR MASS EVACUATIONS MAY TURN INTO TRANSITIONAL HOUSING for those displaced by the eruption, says Hawai‘i County Public Works Deputy Director Merrick Nishimoto. He said the unused air strip was paved as part of the emergency response to the volcanic eruption.
     “The need for the landing strip as a landing zone for the helicopters has passed,” Nishimoto said. “However there’s talks right now about possibly using that for additional, transitional housing. We’re looking into that, possibly putting up additional units there for transitional short-term housing – not long-term housing – but something that we can use for the interim. There are some utilities available, also, all along that landing strip.”
     See the interview with the Hawai‘i County Public Works Deputy Director on Big Island Video News.

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ASH, PARTICULATES, AND SO2 IN OCEAN VIEW will be the subject of a meeting at Ocean View Community Center at 5:30 p.m., Thursday, June 14. The gathering at 92-8924 Leilani Circle will bring together health, science, and Civil Defense officials to meet with the public.
One Kaʻū ʻĀina a.k.a. Team Kaʻū team member designed shirts for the group.
See facebook.com/adrian.anthony.79025
     “Have your vog and ash impact questions answered by representatives from USGS, Department of Health Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response Office and Clean Air Branch, and Hawaii County Civil Defense Agency,” reads the flyer.
     In the meantime, Ocean View medical taxi driver Lannie Columbo, her husband David, and three Ocean View volunteer firefighters - Anthony Columbo, Andrew Columbo, and Lizzy Stabo - are offering to set up a “fresh air environment” for those needing a cleaner air room during ashfall and SO2 events. They did a test run one night from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m., with three air purifiers, at Ocean View Community Center. Lannie said they would be happy to set up the room again, if the need should arise. They call themselves Kaʻū ʻĀina a.k.a. Team Kaʻū - see the Facebook group at facebook.com/adrian.anthony.79025.
     Their effort was sparked by Facebook posts a few weeks ago from community members, who said there was nowhere to go for clean air in Ocean View. They and other community members who have joined the group, some of whom have worked for American Red Cross, have also gone down to Puna to aid those displaced by the eruption.

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ACT 45, BANNING THE USE OF THE PESTICIDE CHLORPYRIFOS, became Hawaiʻi law today, with permits required to use it until 2023, when it will become completely prohibited. With the signature of Gov. David Ige, Hawaiʻi became the first state to ban chlorpyrifos, which the EPA recommended banning entirely in 2015. Sen. Russell Ruderman, who introduced the measure, State Rep. Richard Creagan, and Sen. Josh Green all supported the measure.
Kaʻū state Rep. and physician, Richard Creagan, was a leader in the effort
to ban the pesticide clorpyrifos, as chair of the House Committee on
Agriculture. Photo from Big Island Video News
     Starting Jan. 1, 2019, users of pesticides containing chlorpyrifos or other restricted use pesticides will be required to report annually to the state Department of Agriculture; will be prohibited from using the chemical within a 100-foot buffer zone around schools during school hours; will be prohibited from applying pesticides with chlorpyrifos without a temporary permit, until 2023 when it will be completely banned.
     The Department of Agriculture has already restricted the use of chlorpyrifos in its proposed pesticides rule, and the use of the chemical has declined drastically, said a statement from the governor's office.
     Gov. Ige said, “Protecting the health and safety of our keiki and residents is one of my top priorities. We must protect our communities from potentially harmful chemicals. At the same time, Hawai‘i’s agriculture industry is extremely important to our state and economy. We will work with the Department of Agriculture, local farmers, and the University of Hawai‘i as we seek safe, alternative pest management tools that will support and sustain our agriculture industry for generations to come.”

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THE AIM OF PEACEFULY SECURING DENUCLEARIZATION drew recommendations from Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on Tuesday, following President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un’s Singapore summit. She released the following statement:
     “We must ensure that in the wake of this historic summit, the diplomatic path continues to achieve complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization of North Korea. This is not about blind trust. This is not about points on a political scoreboard. There are lives at stake. In the interest of peace and humanity, we should all be rallying around our country's success in continuing direct talks to remove the North Korea nuclear threat.”
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, speaking from the House floor on full North Korea
denuclearization, yesterday, June 12. See the full video of her speech.
     “Just six months ago, my constituents and people all across Hawai‘i received a harrowing alert on their cell phones that a ballistic missile was incoming and to take cover immediately. It turned out to be a false alarm but the terror that my family, friends, and people all across the State of Hawai‘i experienced was very real, shining a light on the stark reality and the seriousness of the North Korea nuclear threat that hangs over them and this country.
     “The agreement that came from the U.S.-North Korea summit that just concluded late last night committing North Korea to complete denuclearization is a first step but there is far more work to be done. We must be vigilant to make sure that the details of this deal ensure complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea. You hear talking heads on TV talking about who put up more points on the scoreboardmissing the seriousness and the actual point of what we’re dealing with.”
     Again, she said, "This is not a game. There are lives at stake. In the interest of peace and humanity, we should all be rallying around our country's success in continuing to pursue diplomacy and peace to remove this threat and denuclearize North Korea.”
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard has long called for direct
talks with Kim Jong Un. Photo from Wikipedia
     Gabbard has long called for holding direct negotiations without preconditions with North Korea to deescalate and ultimately denuclearize the Korean Peninsula. Most recently, the congresswoman introduced a resolution supporting U.S. diplomatic efforts on the Korean Peninsula by: Welcoming the United States-North Korea summit which follows the South Korea-North Korea summit; recognizing that the American people are committed to peace and support efforts toward diplomatic negotiations to ensure the complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of North Korea; urging President Trump, the Supreme Leader of North Korea, and regional leaders to engage diplomatically to ease tensions on the Korean Peninsula, and exhaust all non-military policy tools before any use of military force; and urging President Trump, partner countries, and members of the United Nations to maintain a campaign of strong economic and diplomatic pressure until North Korea has completely, verifiably, and irreversibly dismantled all of its nuclear, chemical, biological, and radiological weapons programs.
     A statement from Gabbard's office says that she "has and continues to strongly advocate for the defense of Hawai‘i and our country from the threat of a nuclear attack from North Korea, and is a strong advocate for strengthening U.S. missile defense.”
     Full video of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s Speech on the House Floor on Tuesday.

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HAWAI‘I ON THE HILL POLICY SUMMIT AND TASTE OF HAWAIʻI promoted local businesses and issues today. This evening, June 13, it brought some 2,000 people together in the Capitol to enjoy Hawaiian food, music, and aloha, with each receiving a fresh orchid lei.
     Conceived by Sen. Mazie Hirono, it was the fifth annual event, co-sponsored by Chamber of Commerce Hawai‘i. More than 100 members of Hawai‘i’s businesses converged on Capitol Hill, representing a full range of industries – from hospitality, manufacturing, health care, transportation, and education, to agriculture.
Hawaiʻi on the Hill connected business leaders to policy makers at the Capitol
today, Wednesday. Photo from Mazie Hirono
     “We started Hawai‘i on the Hill five years ago to give Hawai‘i businesses direct access to federal decision makers,” said Hirono.
     Others kicking off the summit included Hawai‘i Chamber of Commerce-Hawai‘i President Sherry Menor-McNamara, state Senate President Ronald D. Kouchi, Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, with remarks from them, and question and answer sessions.
     Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, spoke about the longstanding partnership between the Alaska and Hawai‘i Congressional delegations. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA), Ranking Member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, spoke about energy innovation. Sen. Roger Wicker (R-MS), Chair of the Senate Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower, spoke about maritime security issues.
     Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee and Co-Chair of the Joint Select Committee on Budget and Appropriations Process Reform, spoke about the federal budget and appropriations process.
     David Foster, Chief of Staff to Administrator Bette Brand of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Rural Business-Cooperative Service, spoke about federal resources available to support rural agriculture. Allen Gutierrez, Associate Administrator of Small Business Administration’s Office of Entrepreneurial Development, spoke about small business development.
Hawaiʻi on the Hill was hosted Tuesday night at the
residence of the Ambassador from Japan. Above
are Hawaiʻi Chamber of Commerce President Sherry
Menor-McNamara, Sen. Mazie Hirono, Ambassador
Shinsuke, and Mrs. Sugiyama.
Photo from Hawaiʻi Chamber of Commerce
     Lucian Niemeyer, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, and Environment, spoke about the intersection of energy security and defense policy. Scott Mulhauser, Founder of Aperture Strategies, Professor at Georgetown University, and Former Chief of Staff at U.S. Embassy Beijing, spoke about U.S.-China relations.
     Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), closed out the Policy Summit by thanking Hirono for her dedication in representing Hawaiʻi in the U.S. Senate, and took questions on how business leaders can continue their advocacy for Hawaiʻi.

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OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS sent a release, saying they would like to address the recent ballot mailing to the Hawaiian Ranchos landowners, which included the OVCA name and PO Box number.
     “The OVCA is a nonprofit corporation and is not affiliated with any homeowners' association or road maintenance corporation. To clarify, the OVCA does not participate in business or political affairs, specifically issues between interest groups or individuals competing for power and leadership. The Ocean View Community Center has space available for rent as an impartial gathering place.”

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com 
and facebook.com/kaucalendar.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Story Time with Auntie Linda from Tūtū and Me, Thu, Jun 14, 10:30-noon, Nā‘ālehu Public Library. 929-8571

Meeting on Ash and SO2 will be held at Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle, Ocean View, on Thursday, June 14, at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will bring together health, science, and Civil Defense officials to meet with the public.

FRIDAY, JUNE 15
‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, Fri, Jun 15, 10-noon, Kahuku Unit. Hawaiian cultural demonstrations. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

Father’s Day Card, Fri, Jun 15, 2-3pmKahuku Park, H.O.V.E. For ages 6-12 years. Register Jun 12-15. Free. Teresa Anderson, 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

4-H Livestock Show & Sale is Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16, at Anderson Arena, also known as Rocking Chair Ranch, at 47-5124 Hawaiʻi Belt Road in Waimea. Open to the public, the annual event supports young farmers and ranchers. This year marks a century of 4-H in Hawai‘i; the state’s first 4-H livestock club opened in 1918.
     Friday’s events begin at 3:30 p.m. and include shows for rabbits, poultry, and goats.
Saturday’s large animal activities kick off with an 8 a.m. welcome, followed by 4-H participants showing lambs, hogs, steers, and heifers. Competition continues for top showmanship honors in the Round Robin Showmanship Class. Buyer’s registration and lunch is at 12:30 p.m., with the sale of 4-H animals at 2 p.m., including beef steer and heifer, hog, lamb, goat, and possibly poultry and rabbits.
     For more information, contact Galimba at mgalimba@kuahiwiranch.com or 808-430-4927.

SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Nature and Culture: An Unseverable Relationship, Sat, Jun 16, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate guided hike along the Palm Trail, approx. 2 miles. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture, observe catastrophic change and restoration of the land as it transitions from the 1868 lava flow to deeper soils with more diversity and older flora. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

Hands-On Fermented Foods Workshop: Sauerkraut and Kombucha w/ Jasmine Silverstein, HeartBeet Foods, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $50/VAC Members, $55/non-Member. Pre-registration required. Supplies and organic ingredients provided. No cooking skills necessary. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Inspired Figure Drawing Workshop, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pmVolcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $60/VAC Member, $65/non-Member, plus $10 model fee. Students asked to bring materials, see volcanoartcenter.org. 967-8222

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Meeting, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pmOcean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting/training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

The Art Express, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.comdiscoveryharbour.net/art-express

Hula Kahiko - Hope Keawe w/Hula Hālau Mana‘olana Sat, Jun 16, 10:30-11:30am, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Hula performance. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula - Kumu Kaho‘okele Crabbe w/Halauokalani, Sat, Jun 16, 11-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Cultural demonstration. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Bunco and Potluck, Sat, Jun 16, 6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring dish to share. Margie Hack, 541-954-8297

SUNDAY, JUNE 17
People and Land of Kahuku, Sun, Jun 17, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free, guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area's human history. nps.gov/HAVO

MONDAY, JUNE 18
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Discovery Harbour Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Mon, Jun 18, 5-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net


TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Tuesday, June 19, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Cooper Center19-4030 Wright Road, Volcano; Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue, Jun 19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed, Jun
e 20, noon-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

ONGOING
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park invites kamaʻaina and tourist alike to visit the Kahuku Unit. There are no entry fees, and all programs are free of charge. In addition to regularly scheduled Guided Hikes and the monthly Coffee Talk, Kahuku Unit has added daily Ranger Talks, and cultural demonstrations and activities on weekends.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ike Hana Noe ʻAu, Cultural Demonstrations and Activities, at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June, made possible by Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. Make a Ti Leaf Lei, Sat, June 16. Make an Eyelash Lei, Sun, June 17. Make an ͑Ohe Hana Ihu (Nose Flute), Sat, June 23. Make a Mini Feather Kahili, Sun, June 24.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ranger Talks on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
     Guided Hikes begin at 9:30 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June. Meet the ranger at the welcome tent. Sat, June 16: Nature and Culture. Sun, June 17: People and Land. Sat, June 23: Birth of Kahuku. Sun, June 24: ͑Ōhi͑a Lehua.
     Artist in Residence Talk, in the Visitor Center on Fri, June 22, at 10 a.m.
     In the Visitor Contact Station, Coffee Talk, a monthly, casual get together, is held the last Friday of the month. On June 29 at 9:30 a.m., Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund will present Removing Trash, Restoring Habitat.
     Join in the Cultural Festival, Pu ͑uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park, in Hōnaunau, Sat and Sun, June 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     See the Kahuku Unit Rangers,The Kahuku Cowgirls, in the Na ͑alehu 4th of July Parade Sat, June 30, beginning at 10 a.m.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through June 29.
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue (except Mon, June 11), 8-4:30pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through July 14, statewide and online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.
     Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.


5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

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